Buy black-eyed susan Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii Goldsturm: £6.99 Delivery by Crocus

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm'

2 litre pot £9.99 £6.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' black-eyed susan: Large golden-yellow flowerheads


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately fertile, preferably heavy but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August to October
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Large, golden-yellow, daisy-like flowers up to 12cm (5in) across with cone-shaped, blackish-brown centres from August to October. This award-winning black-eyed Susan looks great planted in bold drifts with other late summer-flowering perennials and ornamental grasses. Coping well in a sunny spot, it's ideal for the middle of a border that doesn't dry out over summer.

  • Garden care: Lift and divide congested colonies in autumn or spring. Support with ring stakes or brushwood well before the flowers appear.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm'

"Knee-high golden yellow daisies with deep-brown middles from August until October - tidy, neat and crisply enduring colour linking summer and autumn"

I would buy thisplant again

5

Formed part of a yellow/orange/white border. So far looking happy in spite of the heat

Annie

Somerset

true

17-18 winter may have killed plant

3

Good plant, still hoping it will show life

Jenny

Sutton surrey

My lovely plant is still flourishing after two seasons.

5

As described, this plant is hardy and healthy.

Bewildered

Berkshire

true

Strong, healthy plant.

5

First year of planting, and they are peeping through already!

Joan - you wil flower

Manchester

true

Rudbeckia , a great colour infuser !

5

This took a few months to start flowering but it's only just finished! In the time it didn't flower it grew slow and steady with lots of foliage and buds. I'd definitely buy this for a gift or myself again. My garden has heavy clay yet Rudbeckia just produces abundance of flowers.

Slowcooker

Essex

true

Wonderful Long-lasting colour

5

Great for long-lasting display of vivid colour. Leave the seed heads and there's even winter interest. Mixes well with Hyssop, Helleniums and Ligularias.

Abreaders

Bridgwater

true

Flowers for weeks and weeks

5

Rudbeckia was included in the Cottage Garden ready made borders we bought. All the border plants flourished beautifully through the summer, but the Rudbeckias were particularly outstanding. They started to flower in late July and just went on.... and on, and there are still a few flowers in good shape in mid October! The best value plants we've ever bought. Crocus' delivery is superb, everything is so well packed to arrive undamaged, and their plants are just so fresh, healthy and well grown. We won't shop anywhere else for our plants now and we really look forward to our orders arriving. Well done Crocus!

Greenpinkies

South Coast

true

Rudbeckia fulgidavar.sullivantii'Goldsturm'

4.7 7

100.0

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