Achillea 'Walther Funcke'

20% off all perennials
6 × 9cm pots £17.97 £14.38
in stock
9cm pot £5.99 £4.79
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Achillea 'Walther Funcke' yarrow: Bright, terracotta flowers with flat heads

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: well-drained, including dry
  • Rate of Growth: average
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    The orange-red flowers of this yarrow are tiny, but they form in generous flattened heads, which are useful for adding horizontal interest in the planting scheme. Fading to creamy yellow as they age, they are held high throughout the summer on upright stems, which emerge from a loose clump of ferny foliage. Long-flowering and drought tolerant once established, 'Walther Funcke' works well in borders with a hot colour scheme, but it also makes a great contrast for blues and purples.


  • Garden care: Stake using bamboo canes or brushwood before the flowers appear. Cut down to the ground in late winter, but resist the urge to do this earlier, as the seed heads look lovely in the winter light. Pull out seedlings as they appear, as they rarely match the host plant. Lift and divide large clumps in late autumn or early spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Achillea 'Walther Funcke'

"The most enduring orange-brown achillea, regularly coming through wet winters, and keeping its fiery personality - blend with a sea of softer-toned achilleas"

OK plant

3

I ordered this with the Cerise Queen variety and this didn't seem as strong as that other one e.g. died back much earlier.

Anita

South London

excellent

5

excellent

rob

surrey

true

Great little plant

5

Used Crocus many times in the past, never disappointed.

HJKendrick

Norfolk

true

Beautiful

5

This Achillea is a lovely colour spreads well and a light ferry air about it I have planted them in between Rudibekia the two look very nice.

Heather uk

East Yorkshire

true

Beautiful colour

5

Love this colour always a good plant to grow

Hatters

Staffordshire

true

i have bought several of these and planted in groups

5

planted in groups with perovskia

armandii

hebden bridge

true

Aichillea 'Walter Funcke'

5

Just when I felt like giving up at the end of the summer, These popped up and made themselves known. A bit difficult to prop up but I used echinchea bronze supports from Crocus and the Colours blended well.

Tamarind19

London

true

Achillea Walther funcke

5

Colourful summer plant with other similar plants in border or pot. My gardener is a professional.

Jill

Andover, Hampshire

true

Achillea'Walther Funcke'

4.8 8

100.0

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can we grow in our dry, sunny border? I have a sunny and very dry border up against the front of the house. It is about 14 inches wide but protected by the house from receiving hardly any rain. Because of the window any plants must be less than 1m high. We have considered lavender but would really appreciate any other suggestions.

Carl and Deirdre Leaman

There are some lovely plants (including the lavenders) that will thrive in a dry, sunny spot, but it will be important that they are kept really well watered for the first year or so until they have had a chance to become established. Below are some of the ones we sell, just click on the link below each plant name to find out more about that particular one. Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Cistus&x=5&y=8 Santolina chamaecyparissus Nana http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4359&CategoryID= Lavender http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Lavandula&x=10&y=9 Achillea http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Achillea&x=11&y=7 Echinops http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=echinops+ritro

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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