Cotoneaster 'Hybridus Pendulus'

Cotoneaster 'Hybridus Pendulus'

10 lt pot (standard) £79.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<UL><LI><B>Position:</B> full sun or partial shade<LI><B>Soil:</B> moderately fertile, well-drained soil<LI><B>Rate of growth:</B> average<LI><B>Flowering period:</B> June<LI><B>Hardiness:</B> fully hardy<BR><BR>Pretty, small white flowers in June followed by showy, bright red, autumn berries. This upright evergreen or semi-evergreen shrub forms a lovely tree with weeping branches when grown as a standard. Like most Cotoneasters, it can tolerant a wide range of conditions including dry soil.<BR><BR><li><b>Garden care:</b> In late spring or early summer after flowering lightly cut back any branches that spoil the symmetry of the plant and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant. In autumn trim back lightly any branches that obscure the display of fruit.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Pretty, small white flowers in June followed by showy, bright red, autumn berries. This upright evergreen or semi-evergreen shrub forms a lovely tree with weeping branches when grown as a standard. Like most Cotoneasters, it can tolerant a wide range of conditions including dry soil.

  • Garden care: In late spring or early summer after flowering lightly cut back any branches that spoil the symmetry of the plant and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant. In autumn trim back lightly any branches that obscure the display of fruit.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

How to create a wildlife-friendly garden

Wildlife-friendly gardens are not only more interesting as you can watch all the comings and goings, but they are often more productive as many creatures will help increase pollination. Garden ponds act as a magnet to dragonflies and damsel flies, along w

Read full article

Deer

Deer eat a wide range of plants and usually visit the garden between dusk and dawn. Sometimes the deer have a particular taste for flowers and will eat tulip blooms, but usually it is whole shoots that are lost. Tree trunks and branches may also be damage

Read full article

Autumn Colour

Autumn Colour

Perhaps it is because the colours of autumn are so variable in the UK that we value them all the more when they appear. As levels of sunlight fall in autumn and the days become shorter, photosynthesis is no longer effective. For the tree, leaves tha

Read full article

Small trees with red fruit

Red-fruit, seen against an opalescent winter sky, is always stunning and the hybrid crab apple Malus x robusta 'Red Sentinel' cannot be beaten for winter spectacle. It will scatter small red crab apples on the green grass in autumn and perforate the sno

Read full article

The autumn lipstick reds and pinks

Come autumn the flowers may be fading away, eclipsed by shorter and cooler days, but there’s still plenty of foliage whether on the ground, or held aloft against a sinking sun. Touches of lipstick-red, sombre-burgundy, orange-peel and mustard-seed glow in

Read full article

Plants birds love in the winter garden

As frost descends and the leaves gather on the lawn, the most important colour is red because it glows against the backdrop of fading stems in muddy shades of khaki, grey and brown. Red’s the colour that fixes the rest of the palette and luckily red berri

Read full article