Liriope muscari

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1.5 litre pot £9.99 £7.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Liriope muscari big blue lily-turf: Purple, wand-like flowers and evergreen foliage


  • Position: partial to full shade, but will tolerate a sunnier spot if the soil is reliably moist.
  • Soil: well-drained, neutral to acid soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August to November
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    An extremely useful plant, which will tolerate a range of conditions including dry shade and drought. Dark green, blade-like leaves provide year-round interest and in autumn, just as other flowers are beginning to fade, vibrant, long-lasting wands of deep violet flowers rise above the foliage. Lily-turf is perfect for edging small, shady spaces - the broad grass-like foliage contrasts beautifully with large leaved plants, or for planting in groups beneath deciduous shrubs.

  • Garden care: To encourage new growth, cut off tired-looking leaves down to the ground in spring. This is also the time to lift and divide large clumps.


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more info

Eventual height & spread

Notes on Liriope muscari

"Evergreen rosettes of strappy green leaves and silver-mauve spikes of violet blue flowers in autumn - for quiet shade"

Welcome addition in autumne

5

I've been looking for plants to perk up my borders in autumn when many of the summer perennials are looking drab. This Lirope fits the bill with dark green foliage and attractive purple spikes to add interest to a shadier spot. The plants on offer at the moment in the larger pot size are in vigorous conditon with loads of roots ready to spread out in the last few warner days of autumn.

Kirstie

Midlothian

Yes

Ideal for positioning under the canopy of a small tree

5

I have struggled to find something attractive to site alongside grasses, in partial shade, under the canopy of our relatively small, Betula Moonbeam. It is early days but the Liriope seems ideal & I intend to purchase some more. This plant was among my first set of purchases for Crocus - I was impressed with plant quality, delivery timescale & packaging.

kbs001

Cotswolds

Yes

definitely would buy again

5

created a wider bed which is a bit shady - this filled a slot next to spring bulbs, primroses etc and will now give me some more later colour

Lesley

Stratford upon avon

Yes

1 would buy this plant again

5

very happy

wade

london

Yes

I would reconnend this product

4

Looks lovely in front of a holly bush, which is where we planted it. The colour is a lovely lilac shade.

lizzy

OL15 0DP

Yes

good product

5

Have put these in containers for display. The plants are hardy which is what I wanted. The mauve coloured flowers are different to a lot of plants which flower around this time

Ava

Southampton

Yes

Liriope muscari

4.8 6

100.0

My liriope muscari has never flowered. I have several clumps in different places (shady and partially shady, dry and not so dry). The foliage just sits there and doesn't seem to do anything from one year to the next.

plantlover

Hello, There are a number of reasons for this, but if the plant is getting enough sunlight, then the most likely causes are either a lack of water or nutrients. Feeding with a high potash fertiliser (sulphate of potash or Tomorite) will help, as will making sure it gets lots of water - particularly during the growing season.

Helen

Hi, is the height of this plant based on the height of the flower, or the foliage? If it is the flower, could I get approx height for foliage only? Also, is it possible to divide the plant straight away, e.g. into 2 clumps; when it is received (based on 1.5L pot)? Thanks

n19london

Hello there The eventual height includes the flower wands, but the linear leaves are approx 25-40cm long which form dense clumps, some quite upright, so could still be about 25-30cm tall eventually. I wouldn't spilt this1.5lt pot as it is still quite a young plant. Hope this helps

Plant suggestions for a child's 'Fairy Garden' Sirs, Having recently cleared and replanted much of my garden my 11 year old daughter has asked for her own plot to create a "fairy garden". I love the idea of her looking after her own area, and she will also help, and have part of the vegetable plot. However I am stuck as to which plants (shrubs, perennials or otherwise) to suggest for the fairy garden. The plot she has selected is above the waterfall. The soil is a little heavy but other than that quite good, but it is in the shade of a large sycamore tree. Can you suggest any shade tolerant plants for this area? In case it helps, it sits next to a Japanese inspired area. The area is approximately 2m square, but if you have any ideas that might need more space that is also OK . Thank you.

Adam Prince

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil underneath the tree. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options Epimedium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.epimedium/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I'm not sure if the fairies will love them, but I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Advice on Bamboo and Liriope Hi, I have a typically small back yard at my London Victorian terrace house. I have my heart set on bamboo and would like your advice on the best variety to buy. The width of the area I am looking to plant is just over 4 metres. I don't want it to spread and I don't want it to intrude too much in terms of depth and bushiness as it's a small garden. The one I'm looking at from your website is... Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis - showy yellow-grove bamboo. Is this the right sort of thing? Or any other suggestions? How many plants would I need to buy to fit in the 4m width? Thanks Regards, Gabrielle

Gabrielle Kilpatrick

Hello again Gabrielle, Liriope will grow just about anywhere so they will be a good choice - although they will need more water in the sunnier position. As for spacing, I would plant them at around 20cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello, Many thanks for this advice. I think I will go with the Phyllostachys nigra. Now for another question........ I have 2 garden beds - both are 5 metres long and 50cm deep. One has a width of 30cm and is mostly shade. The other has a width of 15cm and has partial sun. Do you think Liriope would go well in both of these? How far apart do you space Liriope? Regards, Gabrielle

Gabrielle Kilpatrick

Hello Gabrielle, The Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis is a spreading bamboo and has an eventual spread of 6m, so it is not ideal. A better option would be either Fargesia murieliae http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/ or Phyllostachys nigra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/phyllostachys-nigra-/classid.1601/ Both of these are clump-forming, however even these will need to be dug up or 'managed' if you want them not to spread, as even the smallest one will get 1.5m cross. If you are trying to create a hedge effect, then I would recommend planting them at 50cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants for a demanding site! Hi We are looking for a ready-made border for a demanding site. The area is in shade with trees, the soil is clay, and is dry in summer and in the winter. We are wanting, if possibly for it to flower in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter! The area to cover is three areas of 5mtrs x 2mtrs - it is a new border, and we want to have some height at the back of the border. Thank you

A Blunt'vyse

Hello There, We do offer a bespoke planting plan service, but this is charged at ??30 per hour - just click on the following link for more information. http://www.crocus.co.uk/design-service/ I'm afraid though, dry shade is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. You should also keep in mind too that to get a really good floral display, you will need to have a more open, sunny spot - think woodland floors that rarely get the sun, which might have ferns and greenery, but very few flowers. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Planting ideas for under large Cedar trees Hi, We have a garden that has about 10 large cedar trees in it. The garden doesn't contain any plants other than a small yew and holly tree. The soil looks acidic. The garden has not been used or maintained for many, many, years hence pine needles, and cones have just been left to rot down. We have cleaned up as much as we can and cut some of the lower branches off the Cedars. Now our problem is what will grow? We need a hedge, preferably evergreen and quick growing (not leylandii). Also we need ground cover, - we would like grass but are unsure whether it will grow. Is there any way we can pretty this garden up with some evergreens and perennials without too much hassle? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Nadine

Philip Cordell

Hello Nadine, I'm afraid it is going to be pretty difficult to get anything to grow under mature Cedars as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/result/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants to replace a lawn Dear Sir I have a small lawn at the front of my garden and want to use plants other than grass. Can you give me some ideas of plants that could give a low effect of green or some planting scheme that would look ok ? Richard

richard wood

Hello Richard, There are loads of things that you could plant in this area - here are some of the best. Pachysandra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/prices-that-have-been-pruned/pachysandra-terminalis-/classid.3288/ Lamium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/lamium-maculatum-beacon-silver/classid.3133/ Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-dammeri-/classid.1021/ Cotoneaster horizontalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-horizontalis-/classid.1028/ Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Liriope http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/liriope-muscari-/classid.3173/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/ Calluna http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.calluna/ Geranium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/mediterranean-plants/geranium-sanguineum-var.-striatum/classid.2000007127/ I hope this gives you a few ideas, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants for under hedges? Hello, I have two hedges that are only a year old - mostly hawthorn, hazel, wild rose and crab apple. A lot of grasses have grown up into and around them. I am about to weed all this out and was wondering what I could plant underneath to prevent the grasses coming up again in the spring. I was having a look at your perennial prism - what would be good to plant now? I live in Scotland so am a bit worried about the frosts. I would like to get something planted before the spring as we will be moving. Many thanks for your help, Jessica

Jessica Harris

Hello Jessica, I'm afraid it is incredibly difficult to get plants to grow under a hedge as the competition for light, water and nutrients is too fierce. Your best bet would be really tough plants, but even these will have a struggle on their hands, and they will not be very colourful. Here are your best options Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Iris foetidissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3073&CategoryID= Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Evergreen ground cover for under trees Hello, I want to under-plant the five silver birches in our back garden. The soil is fairly dry under the trees, clay based, with morning sun on the front edge of the border but otherwise shady. I want an evergreen cover, low maintenance, with foliage rather than flowers. I am thinking about planting solidly with Pachysandra terminalis, with maybe some ferns to provide a bit of height at the base of the fence. Any alternative ideas would be gratefully appreciated. Regards Janette

Janette Gross

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. I like the idea of the Pachysandra and ferns, but you could also consider any of the following. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Dear Helen Thanks for your suggestions. I think I will add in the Liriope in clumps towards the back. Best wishes Janette

Janette Gross

Suggestions for dry shade under a tree Hello, I have a raised bed around the base of a twisted willow about 1.5metres diameter. Currently I have foxgloves, tulips and day lilies growing, which cope, but all flower early in the year. I've yet to find anything that will cope with these conditions that will flower later and keep the bed looking interesting. It gets a little morning sun on one side but is otherwise in the shade all day and is very dry. We live in France and that is not helping as we get very little rain in the summer and it is often very hot. Please can you help? Pauline

Eric and Pauline

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are the best options for UK gardens - I am not sure how they will cope in your French garden. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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