Pachysandra terminalis

1.5 litre pot £8.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Pachysandra terminalis Japanese spurge: Evergreen ground cover with white flowers. For sun or shade


  • Position: any, from full sun to full shade
  • Soil: tolerates most
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Rosettes of glossy, dark green leaves with serrated edges form dense mats of eyecatching groundcover in sun or shade. In early summer upright clusters of tiny, white flowers contrast beautifully with the dark green foliage. Japanese spurge is perfect for carpeting bare areas of earth between deciduous shrubs or trees.

  • Garden care: Lift and divide congested colonies in autumn or spring.

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more info

Eventual height & spread

"A deep-green carpet under trees and shrubs - with rosettes of shiny toothed leaves that provide light and shade - topped by an insignificant white fragrant cockade"

Hello, I have some pleached Hornbeam trees that are in raised beds. I'd like to plant some ground cover underneath but am concerned about choosing a plant that will be able to cope with the hornbeam in terms of water and nutrients. I have been looking at Pachysandra terminalis as think this will create a nice effect and should be able to cope. Would you agree? The wall is south facing but the house blocks direct sun after midday. Thanks!

curiouscate

Hello, Yes, pachysandra is incredibly tough once established, so they should be fine, but you will need to make sure they are kept well fed and watered for the first year or so.

Helen

Does this grow well in a container? If so how many plants in what size pot do you recommend?

jane

Hello, These are versatile plants, so while they would prefer being planted out in the border, they can be grown in a pot. As for quantities and sizes, it really depends on the effect you have in mind, and also how impatient you are.

Helen

Hi I have a large sloping patch in an unused part of my garden - approx. 90m2. It's north facing, mostly shaded, has chalky soil and is well-drained. I need a fast growing ground cover plant to cover bare soil. Will Pachysandra terminalis do the job? Or can you suggest something else? As it's a large patch, I need something that isn't going to cost a fortune! Thanks for your help.

Mr P

Hello there Yes Pachysandra terminalis is a good ground cover plant that will tolerate your conditions with an average to fast rate of growth. However the rate of growth for any plant varies according to the growing conditions. Alternatively you might like to look at Begenias, - these are quite fast growing and tough. I have attached a link below. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/sort.0/vid.11/vid.186/vid.10/ Hope this helps

3 of my 6 pachysandra are looking a bit sick. Their leaves have gone brown and a bit shrivelled. The other three seem fine. They are in a bed that gets full sun, but the soil can get damp. What might be the problem, and is there a cure?

Sue

Hello, If the soil is particularly wet for any length of time, then this may be causing the problem, but it is difficult to say without seeing the plants. Could you please take some photos and email them across to our customer services team with your order reference number and we can look into it further.

Helen

I'm considering planting pachysandra terminalis in a narrow bed right by the front door (about 8in deep by 6ft long), as it copes with dry shade. Is this plant rampant? Will it be hard to dig out from a small bed (where we can only use a small trowel/fork) if it grows too fast? Will I be able to grow anything else? It is a lovely looking plant, but I've never grown it before. Any advice would be appreciated.

Jude

Hello, I think Pachysandra is a great plant. It does spread but is not too vigorous and is easy to keep under control. Once established it does form a dense mat of foliage, so I would be tempted to just use it ion its own, but if you want to add something else, then the following would be suitable Tiarella Appalachian Trail http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/tiarella-appalachian-trail/classid.2000018234/ Pulmonaria Blue Ensign http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/pulmonaria-blue-ensign/classid.2000004292/

helen

Help with plants for N/East facing garden Hi, I have a little problem choosing some plants....... I really like the look and size of the 'Shady Pink' pre-designed corner planting plan, but our problem is that we have a north east facing garden, so we get no sun at all in the winter, and direct sun for only half a day on either side of the garden during the summer. Would this planting plan be suitable for that level of shade? We are actually are buying plants for the entire garden, so we'd need about 6 new shrubs, and maybe a small tree (we were thinking about the Prunus Amanogawa). Could you please help us with a few shrubs that would do well in these conditions? For perennials, we have been recommended; - Geranium Johnson's Blue, Kniphofia, Crocosmia, and Helleborus foetidus. Are these suitable? Many many thanks! Regards, Josee

Josee Mallet

Hello Josee, It is always difficult to give a definitive answer to the shade issue, but looking at the Shady Pink border, the most shade tolerant plants include Anemone hupehensis Hadspen Abundance, Thalictrum aquilegiifolium and Dryopteris erythrosora. If you click on the following link it will take you to all our shade-loving shrubs http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/plcid.1/vid.11/ and for the shade -loving perennials http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/plcid.2/vid.11/ Of the plants you have listed, the Prunus, Helleborus foetidus, Kniphofia and Crocosmia will be OK as long as there is more sun than shade. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Non poisonous plants for pots please Hi I wonder if you can help. I have a Nursery school and am looking for some plants I can plant in pots, that are in a partly sunny, partly shady spot. They have to be plants that aren't poisonous and provide interest over as much of the year as possible. I really like the plants in you ready made border section on the website site, particularly shady pink, sunny pink and keep it cool. Could you please tell me if any of these plants are suitable for my needs? Many Thanks Joanne

Happy Hearts Day Nursery

Hello Joanne, I think your best option would be to opt for mainly evergreen shrubs as these will provide year-round interest. You can then infill with some of the more colourful perennials. As long as the spot does not get too much shade, then here are some of your best options. Hebe http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hebe/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/prices-that-have-been-pruned/pachysandra-terminalis-/classid.3288/ evergreen ferns http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/plcid.309/vid.228/ Rhododendrons (choose the smaller varieties for pots) http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rhododendron/start.1/sort.0/cat.plants/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plant suggestions for a child's 'Fairy Garden' Sirs, Having recently cleared and replanted much of my garden my 11 year old daughter has asked for her own plot to create a "fairy garden". I love the idea of her looking after her own area, and she will also help, and have part of the vegetable plot. However I am stuck as to which plants (shrubs, perennials or otherwise) to suggest for the fairy garden. The plot she has selected is above the waterfall. The soil is a little heavy but other than that quite good, but it is in the shade of a large sycamore tree. Can you suggest any shade tolerant plants for this area? In case it helps, it sits next to a Japanese inspired area. The area is approximately 2m square, but if you have any ideas that might need more space that is also OK . Thank you.

Adam Prince

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil underneath the tree. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options Epimedium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.epimedium/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I'm not sure if the fairies will love them, but I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants for a demanding site! Hi We are looking for a ready-made border for a demanding site. The area is in shade with trees, the soil is clay, and is dry in summer and in the winter. We are wanting, if possibly for it to flower in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter! The area to cover is three areas of 5mtrs x 2mtrs - it is a new border, and we want to have some height at the back of the border. Thank you

A Blunt'vyse

Hello There, We do offer a bespoke planting plan service, but this is charged at ??30 per hour - just click on the following link for more information. http://www.crocus.co.uk/design-service/ I'm afraid though, dry shade is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. You should also keep in mind too that to get a really good floral display, you will need to have a more open, sunny spot - think woodland floors that rarely get the sun, which might have ferns and greenery, but very few flowers. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Planting ideas for under large Cedar trees Hi, We have a garden that has about 10 large cedar trees in it. The garden doesn't contain any plants other than a small yew and holly tree. The soil looks acidic. The garden has not been used or maintained for many, many, years hence pine needles, and cones have just been left to rot down. We have cleaned up as much as we can and cut some of the lower branches off the Cedars. Now our problem is what will grow? We need a hedge, preferably evergreen and quick growing (not leylandii). Also we need ground cover, - we would like grass but are unsure whether it will grow. Is there any way we can pretty this garden up with some evergreens and perennials without too much hassle? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Nadine

Philip Cordell

Hello Nadine, I'm afraid it is going to be pretty difficult to get anything to grow under mature Cedars as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/result/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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