Hydrangea macrophylla 'Madame Emile Mouillere'

Hydrangea macrophylla 'Madame Emile Mouillere'

2 litre pot £12.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><li><b>Position:</b> full sun or partial shade<li><b>Soil:</b> moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> average<li><b> Flowering period:</b> July and August<li><b>Hardiness:</b> fully hardy<br><br>Wonderful, white flowers from July to August, becoming pink-tinged with age, and coarsely toothed, dark green leaves. This popular, mophead hydrangea is ideal for brightening a partly shady border with moist, well-drained soil. While young it makes an attractive container or house plant.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> Hydrangeas do not like to dry out. In dry weather, soak the roots with a hose and the plant will usually recover. Remove faded flowerheads in spring after the danger of frosts, cutting back the flowered stems to a strong pair of buds. Take out misplaced or diseased shoots. Mulch young plants with a well-rotted manure or compost in spring. Once established, remove a quarter to a third of the shoots to the base of the plant.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July and August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Wonderful, white flowers from July to August, becoming pink-tinged with age, and coarsely toothed, dark green leaves. This popular, mophead hydrangea is ideal for brightening a partly shady border with moist, well-drained soil. While young it makes an attractive container or house plant.

  • Garden care: Hydrangeas do not like to dry out. In dry weather, soak the roots with a hose and the plant will usually recover. Remove faded flowerheads in spring after the danger of frosts, cutting back the flowered stems to a strong pair of buds. Take out misplaced or diseased shoots. Mulch young plants with a well-rotted manure or compost in spring. Once established, remove a quarter to a third of the shoots to the base of the plant.

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Eventual height & spread

I would highly recommend this beautiful hydrangea

5

This lovely mop head hydrangea is white with tinges of pink. It can grow in full sun or part shade. I grow it in a part shady border with other shrubs and perennials and although it still is quite small now it lights up the border when in flower. It doesn't grow too big so would also look good in a large pot.

Nicky

Fawdington

Yes

I would recommend this shrub.

5

In its first season it carried more flowers than I expected so soon: at first they were an intense and beautiful white, then tinged with green and then pink, and were still on the plant in November. Excellent for flower arranging, including dried. My plant is in a fairly shady corner with very heavy clay. The soil has been enriched with manure and compost, including some ericaceous because our soil is alkaline. I suspect the latter compost was unnecessary. Large, healthy leaves. In one prolonged dry spell I watered the shrub generously but on the whole it didn't seem to need watering because of its position.

Gardenreader

East Midlands

Yes

3982

5.0 2

100.0

I planted this hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla 'Madame Emile Mouillere') as soon as it arrived, in part-shade against an east-facing wall - it's only been in situ a couple of weeks but the leaves, while still very green and healthy-looking, are covered in a dull coating of grey mould - is this powdery mildew? How to remedy, and should I move it to my south-facing border into full sun to prevent it happening again?

Harriet

Hello, It could well be powdery mildew, which is usually a sign that the plant is too dry at the base, with poor air circulation around the crown. With that in mind, the powdery mildew should improve if you can remedy the growing conditions.

Helen

I have a gravel area south facing currently trimmed with lavender for low maintenance . I was wondering which Hydrangea or mix of hydrangeas would suit filling this area approx 30x5ft

Bonedome

Hello, Many hydranges (particularly the macrophylla types) will grow happily in sunnier spots, but they all prefer to have shelter from the sun during the hottest part of the day, and even more importantly, they should not be allowed to get too dry. Perhaps then, they are not an ideal partner for the lavenders, which, when established thrive in hot, dry sun.

Helen

I like hydrandea mad. Emile mouliliere, but i dont want it to grow higher than 1 m. Is it possible to keep the height down with pruning?

Agapanthus

Hello there Eventually this plant given the right conditions can grow to 2m and although you can hard prune hydrangeas, they flower on last years wood so you are not going to want to prune the non-flowering stems as this will be at the expense of the flowers. It might be better to choose one of the smaller more compact whit hydrangeas such as Hydrangea macrophylla 'Zebra' or Hydrangea macrophylla 'Dancing Snow'. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hydrangea-macrophylla-zebra-pbr/classid.2000014390/ http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hydrangea-macrophylla-dancing-snow/classid.2000023657/

have a north facing bed at front of house sheltered with brick wall at the back would this hydrangea be suitable have free draining soil its a large bed so would need another plant to complement each other

retiredmum

Hello, This plant will tolerate a little light shade, but it flowers best in a sunnier spot. The H. paniculata's tend to fare better in shadier spots, and if you click on the link below it will take you to our range, most of which have suggestions for planting companions on their card. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.paniculata/sort.0/vid.186/

Helen

how tall does this plant grow approx. in feet please

art

Hello, This plant has an eventual height of around 8 feet.

Helen

I bought a hydrangea from Blooms, Worcester which I was told was 'Madame Emile Mouillier' - in full bloom - and in an indoor display. having carefully planted it in partial shade some three weeks ago it is now beginning to look a little sick and not appearing to put on any growth. What, if any, could be the problem?

cubabob

Hello, If you bought this plant in full bloom a few weeks ago, then it has been 'forced' (ie grown in an artificial environment that tricks the plant into thinking that it is later in the year than it really is). While this practice makes things very appealing on the garden centre benches, it does play havoc with the plants metabolism for a little while, so you probably just need to give it time and it will probably recover eventually (or even next year). For now though, I suspect it is looking sick because it is either reacting to the sudden change of temperatures, or it could simply think that flowering season is over and it has done its stuff for the year.

Helen

Hi I would like to plant a white hydrangea in a large zinc planter. Please advise on variety. Also should I drill holes in the planter? I am worried that it will dry out but also if I do not drill holes it may get water logged. The planter will be situated in a North Eastern aspect. Looking forward to your reply.

Brighton

Hello, I am not sure the size of your planter, but I woukd recommend choosing one of the more compact hydrangeas, such as 'Zebra' - please click on the following link to go straight to it. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hydrangea-macrophylla-zebra-pbr/classid.2000014390/ As for the planter itself, if you are going to plant straight into it, then you should have drainage holes in the bottom so the excess water can drain away. Otherwise, the hydrangea could easily become waterlogged.

Helen

I want to move two hydrangeas from full sun, dry condition to a slightly shaded border, when is the best time to do this please?

wizzy

Hello there The best time to move established shrubs is in the autumn when they are not actively growing, but the soil will still be warm, so now would be an ideal time. Hope this helps.

I have recently bought a Hydrangea Macrophylla. It has white mop head flowers older ones now fading pink and each floret has a slightly frilled edge, not smooth like others. Can you tell me if it is Madame Emile Mouillere or are there other possibilities? We want to get another one!

woodrow

Hello, There are many hundred (if not thousands) of different hydrangeas, so it will be difficult to say for sure which one you have. If it is important that you have exactly the same plant, then I would recommend taking soft-wood cuttings in early summer from the one you already have.

helen

I'd really like to plant this in front of my house as a pair in two large pots. Will it cope/flower well facing North East?

crazy lady

Hello there Hydrangeas will tolerate some shade but to flower they will need some sun, otherwise the blooms will be sparse or non at all. Also if you are going to plant them in pots they need to be kept well watered as they need a moist well-drained soil, and feed in the growing season.

Mine do well, set facing all points of the compass. I keep them out of the hottest part of the garden, feed them, water at night for a few weeks to get them settled and then just leave them to get on with the flowering. I do cut down any non-flowering stems to encourage the "food" to go into flowering, don't know if this is right but it works wonderfully for me.

Daisie

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