Fallopia baldschuanica

2 litre pot £14.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Fallopia baldschuanica Russian vine: Extremely fast-growing climber

This climber is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any poor to moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: extremely fast-growing
  • Flowering period: August and September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    In August and September this woody deciduous climber is literally smothered with panicles of tiny, funnel-shaped, pink-tinged white flowers. Ideal for covering an unsightly structure or wall in sun or partial shade, but plant with caution since it's extremely fast-growing and can end up choking everything in its path!

  • Garden care: Each year in early spring cut back to fit the available space

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Eventual height & spread

Not for this garden!

3

We are in a brand new house/garden so are trying to stock up quickly with good structure. I had this plant in my Edinburgh garden and it was lovely and extremely vigorous. However, we are now in a very rural area of the Southern Highlands and whilst the plant arrive perfectly healthy and was happy when first planted it has since been completely defoliated by Dock Beetle (it happened in 24hrs!). Maybe once more balance is achieved in this new garden such pests shall become less of an issue - we shall see what happens next year!

Heather

Balquhidder

false

Would buy again

4

Slow grower

Suz

Scotland

true

Fallopia baldschuanica

3.5 2

50.0

I'm growing my Russian Vine on a roof terrace so I have no option other than to grow it in a pot (approx. 25L) How often do I need to add feed to the soil? Any other special treatment I need to keep the plant in these conditions?

Jugsi

Hello there We don't recommend this climber to be grown in a pot as it grows so fast so quickly. As long as it is kept well watered with a moderately fertile soil, not much stops it growing. If you are still going to grow it in a pot then you could add a controlled release fertiliser in with the compost when planting.

Can this be grown in the pot. I need to cover a large area of wire fencing but the soil in that part of the garden is mainly rubble so unsuitable for planting.

KarenJ

Hello, These plants get very large very quickly, so they are not suitable for pots I'm afraid.

Helen

how can i slow this plant down

valleyboy

Hello, This is going to be tricky I'm afraid as I don't think there are any plant growth regulators available on the market any more. In spring, you can cut it back to fit the available space, but as these are incredible fast (and eventually very large) plants, if it is too big for the space, then it would be better to replace it.

Helen

Advice on plants to cover an unsightly wire fence please Hello I need a very quick growing plant to disguise an ugly fence made up of wire pig netting and wooden posts - about 25 metres long and 1 metre high. Could 'Russian Vine' be persuaded to do the job? The complication is that we're hoping to sell our house later this year - so it needs to be quick to be effective! Open sunny site, good soil. Any ideas would be welcome. Thanks

Mike Coulson

Hello there, Russian vine is the fastest climber available, so if anything is going to cover your fence this will. Even this though will have its work cut out to cover it, so you will need to plant several to get good coverage this year - and the new owners will just have to take it all out next year. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Is a 'Russian Vine' self clinging? Hi there - can you tell me if Russian Vines are self clinging or do they need a support to climb up? Susan

Susan Shakespeare

Hello There, Russian vines are not self-clinging, so will need something to clamber onto. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Advice please on my Russian Vine Hi, I bought a Russian Vine from you about four months ago, however it hasn't yet flowered. What am I doing wrong? Any suggestions? Kind Regards Michael

Mike Caulfield

Hello Michael, There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade, not enough water or nutrients, or pruning at the wrong time of the year. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why your Russian Vine has not produced buds, but you can give it a bit of a push for next year by feeding with a high potash fertiliser. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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