Solanum crispum 'Glasnevin'

Solanum crispum 'Glasnevin'

3 litre pot £12.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><br><li><b>Position:</b> full sun<li><b>Soil:</b> fertile, moist but well-drained soil<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> fast-growing<li><b>Flowering period:</b> June to September<li><b>Hardiness:</b> frost hardy (needs winter protection)<br><br>Deep purple-blue, scented blooms appear in generous clusters from summer to autumn creating a pretty spectacular display. These are followed by yellowish-white fruits. The dark green leaves will usually stay on the plant in milder winters, but will drop if the temperatures become too low. This vigorous climber is perfect for covering a sunny, sheltered wall or fence. Lavenders and catmint are ideal companion plants, clothing the ground underneath the climber and helping to balance the design.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> Tie in stems to horizontal wires or trellis. In early spring remove a third of the oldest stems to ground level.<br><br></li></ul>
  • Harmful if eaten


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection)

    Deep purple-blue, scented blooms appear in generous clusters from summer to autumn creating a pretty spectacular display. These are followed by yellowish-white fruits. The dark green leaves will usually stay on the plant in milder winters, but will drop if the temperatures become too low. This vigorous climber is perfect for covering a sunny, sheltered wall or fence. Lavenders and catmint are ideal companion plants, clothing the ground underneath the climber and helping to balance the design.

  • Garden care: Tie in stems to horizontal wires or trellis. In early spring remove a third of the oldest stems to ground level.

  • Harmful if eaten
Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

Looking good

5

The plant arrived well packed and in a healthy conditio. A late season planting but the plant is well established. The Solanum is now well secured to the walled garden and we are looking forward to enjoying its display as soon as the warm weather returns.

Al

Preston, Lancashire

Yes

I would buy this product again.

5

I had one of these plants at my last address. Liked it so much bought the same again and will look just as good when matured.

Mick

Stevenage

Yes

Hardier than you might think

4

I have had a Solanum 'Glasnevin' in my town garden in East Anglia against an east facing fence for about 20 years. It survived the hard winters of 2011 and 2012. It has now lost its youthful vigour and I shall be replacing it.

Rose G

East Anglia

Yes

Tiny Flowers.

3

Seems to be fast growing. The leaves smell of potato peel. And the light mauve flowers are pretty but very tiny. The fact that it is not hardy works against it. It`s a nice enough climber to grow up a tall fence but that`s it.

Tropical22

Cheshire

No

Solanum crispum'Glasnevin'

4.3 4

75.0

Hi, How do we know when to harvest the potatoes? Thank you. With kind regards, Stanley

maps

Hello, It depends on which type of potatoes you are growing. Generally the first earlies can be lifted in June or July andf second earlies in July and August after the flowers open or the buds start to drop. When harvesting maincrops, wait until the foliage goes yellow, cut it back, then wait for 10 dfays or so before lifting the crop.

Helen

Can you please suggest something to plant under my Chilean potato tree? I have had no luck with anything I have tried, I assume due to its roots taking over. It is west facing, and ideally I want something not as attractive to bees as lavender, as my young children play in this area.

SCGH

Hello, If the roots of the potato vine are well established, then you will need to make sure whatever you plant is kept really well fed and watered if it is going to survive. If you can do that, then I would recommend something really tough. Here are some of the best. Cotoneaster Coral Beauty http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/cotoneaster--suecicus-coral-beauty/classid.1022/ Luzula nivea http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/luzula-nivea/classid.2002/ Skimmia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.skimmia/sort.0/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/sort.0/

Helen

I recently purchased from yourselves a 'Glasnevin' which has since grown vigorously but produced no flowers at all. This can't be normal so what is wrong? It is in a sunny spot, in a container with JI No.3 and with some multi purpose compost.

kevin

Hello there There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade or not enough water or nutrients. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why yours has not produced buds, but given time and the right conditions, there is no reason why it won't flower. You can often give them a bit of a push by feeding during the growing season with a high potash fertiliser. Hope this helps

Can this be planted in a pot, or does it need to be in the ground? Thanks.

Mona

Hello, It is a big plant so ideally it should be planted in a sheltered spot in the garden. It will survive however in a really large pot for several years if it is kept really well fed and watered.

helen

my solanum crispum glasnevin is coming up to its 3 summer it had budded up all over earlier in the year but 2/3 of the plant buds have since dry up and died could this have happened because of a late frost or maybe this has happened because I didn't take 1/3 of the old wood back to ground leval or is their another reason for this or do I need to dig this plant out and start again many thanks

big ale

Hi there It is difficult to say exactly why some of the buds have died on your Solanum, it could be that it has been caught by one of the late frosts as it is not fully hardy. I wouldn't give up on the plant, I would trim it back, give it a feed, and as long as the damage is not too severe it should come back. Hope this helps

Georgina

Looking for a suitable plant to screen pipe I am looking for advice please. We have recently installed a downstairs toilet which involved erecting a very large ugly grey pipe (vertically) which almost reaches the eaves of the house. The position of the house/pipe wouldn't be suitable for a tree as it is directly on the driveway side of the house. Could you possibly suggest a fast growing bushy evergreen climber to disguise it? I'd thought of ivy but perhaps you could suggest something bushier or better?Many t hanks Elizabeth

elizabeth cairns

Hello Elizabeth, There are very few truly evergreen climbers that are fast growing, so ivy may be a good option. Another option may be Clematis armandii, but this is not quite fully hardy - just click on the following link to go straight to it http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/clematis-armandii-/classid.863/ or if you want a semi-evergreen, then these two might be worth considering. Lonicera japonica Halliana http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/honeysuckle/lonicera-japonica-hallian/classid.1678/ or Solanum (again not quite fully hardy) http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/other-climbers/solanum-crispum-glasnevin/classid.1720/ I hope this helps Helen Plant Doctor

elizabeth cairns

Evergreen climbers for south facing pots Hi, I have a south facing veranda which does get very hot in the summer. We are in the lee of a valley so pretty sheltered. I want to plant three evergreen climbers to go up the posts of the veranda and along the top of it. Please can you advise the best plants and also how big the pots should be and what compost they should go in. Thanks Rosemary

Hello Rosemary, There are several plants worth considering, but it will be crucial that the plants go into really large pots (the biggest you can find), and that they are kept well fed and watered. Here are some of my favourites Clematis cirrhosa var balearica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/clematis-cirrhosa-var.-balearica/classid.871/ C. Freckles http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/clematis-cirrhosa-var.-purpurascens-freckles/classid.872/ Lonicera henryi http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/honeysuckle/lonicera-henryi-/classid.1676/ Solanum crispum Glasnevin http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/other-climbers/solanum-crispum-glasnevin/classid.1720/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

Deer

Deer eat a wide range of plants and usually visit the garden between dusk and dawn. Sometimes the deer have a particular taste for flowers and will eat tulip blooms, but usually it is whole shoots that are lost. Tree trunks and branches may also be damage

Read full article

March pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

The following notes can be used as a guide when pruning trees, shrubs and climbers in your garden during the month of March. It's timely advice if you have any of the following in your garden. Abeliophyllum, Artemesia, Brachyglottis, Brunfelsia, Buddleja

Read full article

April pruning of trees, shrubs and
climbers

Many shrubs, trees and climbers are showing signs of growth, so it is an ideal time to check them over for winter damage. If you feel they need a little care and attention, here are a few notes to use as a pruning guide. during April.

Read full article

Protecting tender plants

February, March and sometimes even April, can be the coldest months of the year and many plants can be severely damaged by late frosts that kills any new growth that might have begun to emerge. The best way to protect tender, wall shrubs such as ceanothus

Read full article