Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii

9cm pot £7.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii spurge: Handsome tall evergreen with chartreuse flowers in spring

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: light, well-drained garden soil
  • Rate of growth: fast growing
  • Flowering period: March to May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This handsome euphorbia has upright stems clothed with whorls of fleshy, glaucous leaves and topped with huge heads of chartreuse-green flowers with bronze 'eyes' from March to May. The Edwardian garden designer Gertrude Jekyll described this sun-loving, evergreen shrub as 'one of the grandest of plants'. Euphorbia characias originates from the Mediterranean, where it is found on dry rocky slopes and scrubland, so it is very tolerant of drought once it becomes established. It forms a natural rounded shape, and brings structure and an architectural quality to the garden. A tall mainstay of the traditional herbaceous border, it's equally at home in a contemporary minimalist or gravel garden. It may self-seed, but plants rarely come true from seed.

  • Garden care: Each stem is biennial, so will produce leaves in its first year and flower in its second. Once the stem has produced a flower it should be cut right back to its base, or to a point where there is new growth emerging, in midsummer. This will make way for lots of new, fresh shoots. When working with spurges always wear gloves since the milky sap is poisonous and a potential skin irritant. Remove seedlings as they appear.

  • CAUTION toxic if eaten/skin & eye irritant
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii

"Adds excellent 'bones' to the herbaceous border, Mediterranean or gravelled area and is equally at home in a contemporary or traditional garden"

Very attractive plant. Would buy another one.

5

A bit slow to start growing but is flourishing now. Looks pretty when the rain settles on it.

Caza

St Albans

true

Euphorbia arrived in excellent condition and is thriving now

5

This Euphorbia is at the back of my Mediterranean patio. It arrived well packaged and clearly healthy. It has now quadrupled in size and still looks healthy

Kathy

Norwich

true

Beautiful plants

5

This a great architectural plant that largely looks after itself, a great favourite

JennyP

Hampton Court

true

Fantastic plants - beautiful euphorbia

5

I have planted these into a semi shaded mixed border. They have thrived. The plants were a good size when they arrived and have bushed out well. Despite the very hot summer, once established they have survived without further watering and are one of the greenest things in the garden.

Weekendsinhereford

Hereford

Growing well after 1 yrs growth , good quality plant

5

Excellently packaged compared to other companies I have used. Plant is doing great after 1 yrs growth

Ang

Ayrshire

true

Striking

5

Received fine healthy plants mid summer last year. Dug in plenty grit before planting them and doing really well so far. Using them to separate a decked and patio area. At this moment in time (early spring) looking great but just little toddlers at the moment, can't wait to see them grow up.

Dee

Falkirk

true

Every garden must have one!

5

Love love love all euphorbia. This is a good standard specimen which grows well

Jim the Gardener

Leics

true

Fabulous addition to the garden

5

Bought three last year and planted last spring, this year they've grown really well and are a picture of health and happiness and look absolutely stunning in my sunny border. Great quality plants!

Bee

North London

true

78198

5.0 8

100.0

My flowering Euphorbia has become so heavy, that a big chunk of he plant was pulled down and broke off. Any chance to rescue the broken off part?

Betty

If the stem has snapped, then there is little chance of saving it, but you may like to cut it and enjoy it in a vase for a few days. Do wear gloves when tackling this however as their milky sap can be an irritant. Do also keep in mind that the stems of this Euphorbia should be cut back to their base in midsummer, which makes way for the following years flowering stems.

Helen

Hi Can Euphorbia characias wulfenii be planted in a pot

Jeniren

Hello there This is a lovely euphorbia, but it is one of the largest growing,-it can grow to 1.5m x1.2m eventually. I would use one of the smaller varieties, like Euphorbia amygdaloides 'Purpurea' or Euphorbia wallichii. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/euphorbia-wallichii/classid.1000000620/ http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/euphorbia-amygdaloides-purpurea/classid.2779/ Hope this helps.

when can I prune this and remove the flowering branches?

Lorraine

Hello there Once the stem has produced a flower it should be cut right back to its base, or to a point where there is new growth emerging, from late summer or autumn. Please remember when working with spurges always wear gloves since the milky sap is poisonous and a potential skin irritant. Hope this helps.

Can you recommend a tall growing euphorbia I can plant in a dry dappled shaded area of my garden. The bed is west facing and it would be planted in front of a laurel hedge and in a border of shrubs. Thank you Lynda

Bopa

Hello there I have attached a link to Euphorbias that will tolerate a west facing, dry site in light shade. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.euphorbia/sort.0/vid.189/vid.106/vid.167/ The tallest variety can grow to 1m, - Euphorbia cornigera 'Goldener Turm' or Euphorbia cornigera. Hope this helps

Dear Plant Doctor My Euphorbia characias wulfenii has recently turned dry and yellow and looks like it is dying --is this the heat or too much water? Any advice would be much appreciated - this plant is one of main features in our small garden.

SmallTownGardener

Hello, It is difficult to know from your description what could be causing this. They tend to thrive in hot, sunny spots, but if it has only recently been planted, then it will need a lot more water than it would normally. If however it is planted into heavy soil that holds on to water for any length of time, it may well be unhappy and waterlogged. It is also worth keeping in mind that as each stem is biennial, it should be cut right back to its base (or to a point where there is new growth emerging) after it has flowered. This should be tackled in midsummer and will make way for lots of new, fresh shoots. Remember to wear gloves though as the milky sap is poisonous.

Helen

Hi I purchased a couple of Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii from you which have been planted now for 2.5 - 3 years. I gave one to my neighbour. Mine is in a spot it seems to love which is dry and sunny and has grown to a good size, over 1 metre wide and it sends out a very strong odour for some reason. Its never flowered though and I'm wondering if I'm doing anything wrong? Thanks Andrea

Sandy1

Hello, This does sound unusual, as if they are growing in a sunny spot they usually flower really well. It is worth keeping in mind that each stem will only flower in its second year, so it is important not to cut the stems back until they have flowered - or you may never see any. The other thing you can do to give them a bit of a push is to feed it with a fertiliser that is high in potash. Tomorite i ideal.

Helen

What plants would you recommend for my Mediterranean style garden? Our garden is quite well established and has a Mediterranean feel. We have quite a few spaces that need filling and were hoping you could suggest a few things?

Mrs C Taylor

We have several plants that might interest you - here are some of the best Lavandula http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.lavandula/?s=lavandula Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cistus/?s=cistus Kniphofia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.kniphofia/?s=kniphofia Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.euphorbia/?s=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/yucca-filamentosa-/classid.4537/ Eryngium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.eryngium/?s=eryngium Sedum http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.sedum/?s=sedum Brachyglottis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/brachyglottis-dunedin-group-sunshine/classid.4376/ Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/convolvulus-cneorum-/classid.940/

Crocus

What can I plant in a Mediterranean style garden? I want give my garden a Mediterranean look but I do not know what to plant. Could you please help?

[email protected]

There are quite a few plants that we sell on the website which will give you a mediterranean feel to your garden - here are some of the best any of the Kniphofias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=kniphofia any of the Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=yucca+fil Stipa tenuissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1000000022&CategoryID= any of the Eryngiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=eryngium any of the Sedum spectabile http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=sedum+spect any of the Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Erigeron http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=erigeron Brachyglottis compacta Sunshine http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4376&CategoryID= Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Phlomis italica http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=phlomis Lavandula x intermedia Dutch Group http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4046&CategoryID= Festuca glauca http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Festuca+glauc&x=12&y=10

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