Cortaderia selloana 'Pumila'

2 litre pot £14.99
within 2 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Cortaderia selloana 'Pumila' pampas grass: Handsome flower plumes

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Silky, silvery-yellow flower plumes in late summer above large mounds of sharp-edged, mid-green leaves. 'Pumila' is a particularly compact and free-flowering variety of this much-maligned ornamental grass. We've chosen it as one of our recommended plants since it makes an excellent all-year focal-point for the smaller garden.

  • Garden care: Protect the crowns of young plants during the first winter with a deep, dry mulch. Each year in late-winter or early-spring wearing stout gardening gloves remove the previous year's stems by cutting and combing. Make sure you do wear stout gardening gloves when you are working with these plants as the leaves have sharp margins which can cut your hands.

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Cortaderia selloana'Pumila'

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Hi there, Can I grow pampas in a pot or does it need to planted into the ground?

Karen

Hello there Ideally it would be better grown in the ground, but this is a compact form so it could be grown in a container as long as it is a large one, and it is kept well watered and fed. Hope this helps.

Hi there, Would i be able to grow pampas grass in a pot? As I only have a balcony, which is also on the 6th floor. So i wonder would it be destroyed by wind? Thanks.

Karen

Hello there Unfortunately I wouldn't recommend this grass for a balcony as the plumes and stems could be damaged in the wind. Sorry to disappoint you.

Hello when is the best time to plant Pampas grass?

JanetP

Hello there As a general rule plants that are grown in containers can be planted at any time of year as long as the soil isn't frozen solid. The best times are in the autumn when the soil is still warm enough to encourage root growth but the plant isn't in active growth, or the spring before the temperatures start to rise. So you could plant the pampas grass now as long as it isn't freezing. Hope this helps.

would it be alright to plant a cortaderia selloana on ground which has a sewage systen about 2 ft underneath?

bubbles

Hello, I have never heard of them causing a problem, but 2' sounds very shallow for the sewage pipe, so I would probably advise against it. If you want to plant anything at all, then I would opt for low groundcover that has a shallow root system such as Bergenia, Vinca or Stachys

helen

Can I cut my Pampas grass back? Dear Crocus, I am hoping someone would be able to guide me a little. I have a 7 year old silver pampas grass. It's a fabulous specimen but I am struggling to remove the previous years dried stems. Would it hurt the plant terribly if I cut the entire thing to the ground and took out the debri that way and then just let it re vamp itself? Many thanks for your time. Kind regards Beverley

Paul Robinson

Hello Beverley, You should not do it every year, but every so often you can usually cut them back to about 30cm without doing too much harm - but it should be done in late winter or early spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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