Allium 'Globemaster'

1 bulb £4.99
in stock
5 bulbs £24.95 £20.00
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Allium 'Globemaster' ornamental onion bulb: Enormous, deep violet globes

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy
  • Bulb size: 18/20

    The spherical heads of 'Globemaster' can grow up to 15cm across, and they are made up of numerous star-shaped, sterile flowers. These appear in midsummer, and look great in pots, but they can also be woven through a sunny border, dotted in groups among lower-growing perennials that will mask their foliage, which usually dies back before the flowers emerge.

  • Garden care: Enrich the soil with added compost and plant the bulbs 15cm deep. Space them at 25cm intervals to take full advantage of the big flower heads. Make sure the soil does not get too wet or waterlogged, and divide large clumps in autumn or spring.

  • CAUTION do not eat ornamental bulbs
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Allium 'Globemaster'

"Powerful rulers of the early summer garden with completely round, densely packed heads of purple on strong stems - and this Goliath repeat flowers too."

When is an ideal time to plant these bulbs please

A gardener

Hello there Alliums can be planted in the autumn or early spring. Hope this ehlps

Allium 'Globemaster' planting Please can you tell me if it is too late to plant the above bulbs at the end of November. Many thanks Valerie

Valerie

Hello Valerie, It is a little late, but if you get them in the ground as soon as possible you should not have any problems. You should enrich the soil with added compost and plant the bulbs 15cm deep. Space them at 25cm intervals to take full advantage of the big flower heads. Make sure the soil does not get too wet or waterlogged over winter. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

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