Rootgrow - licensed by the Royal Horticultural Society

150g pack £4.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Rootgrow - licensed by the Royal Horticultural Society: <b> The first and currently the only plant or soil treatment to be licensed by The Royal Horticultural Society.</b><br><br>RHS gardeners find plants treated with Rootgrow:<ul> <li>Have superior plant establishment with better natural vigour</li> <li>Overcome re-plant problems more successfully</li> <li>Have better developed root systems</li> <li>Are better able to cope with conditions of drought</li> <li>Are supported for their entire lifetime after a single application.</li></ul><strong>"At RHS Garden Wisley, we use Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi when planting trees and shrubs and we are now starting to use it when planting perennials. For me, using Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi has become one of the most important ingredients to ensure planting success" <p>Colin Crosbie - Curator RHS Garden Wisley</strong><br><br><b>> How it works</b><br>Mycorrhizal fungi do everything plant roots do, but better. When new plants are planted with Rootgrow it takes only 2-4 weeks under normal conditions for these fungi to start benefiting plants. In that time they attach themselves to the plant's root system and grow out rapidly into the soil, searching for nutrients and water. They essentially become part of the plant's own root system.<br><br><b>> Better nutrient uptake</b><br>These fungi are so much thinner and finer than the plant's own roots, so can find nutrients in the soil far more efficiently than the plant's own coarse roots. They are especially good at finding nutrients responsible for flowering and fruiting such as phosphorus and potassium. As they can explore a much greater area of soil than the plant's own roots they are also far more likely to find the trace elements and rare nutrients all plants need to grow well.<br><br><b>> Drought tolerance</b><br>Mycorrhizal fungi are an essential part of a plant's ability to combat drought. Leaves and stems have developed mechanisms to combat drought such as silver leaves, waxy leaves and hairy leaves but these adaptations on their own aren't enough if the plant doesn't have its friendly fungal partner on its roots. Mycorrhizal fungi hold onto water in soils like a sponge.<br><br><b>> Establishment in difficult soils</b><br> Mycorrhizal fungi will enable plants to establish and thrive even in difficult soils. In poor sandy soils the mycorrhizal fungi will be able to find scarce nutrients and hold onto water. In clay soils these fungi will be able to unlock nutrients from the soil acting like a clay breaker.<br><br><b>Usage guidelines:</b><br>For a 9cm pot use 5g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 30 plants). For a 2-3 litre pot use 25g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 6 plants). For a 4-5 litre rose use 50g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 3 plants). For a 10-15 litre tree use 50g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 3 trees).<br><br>Empathy is about making a choice to garden with minimal use of chemicals whilst maximising plant growth and health. Empathy products are biological, they will benefit your plants not just over a few months but through their lifetime and are designed to treat the soil as well as the plant. Empathy supports the RHS mission for 'Sharing the best in Gardening'.

The first and currently the only plant or soil treatment to be licensed by The Royal Horticultural Society.

RHS gardeners find plants treated with Rootgrow:

  • Have superior plant establishment with better natural vigour
  • Overcome re-plant problems more successfully
  • Have better developed root systems
  • Are better able to cope with conditions of drought
  • Are supported for their entire lifetime after a single application.
"At RHS Garden Wisley, we use Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi when planting trees and shrubs and we are now starting to use it when planting perennials. For me, using Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi has become one of the most important ingredients to ensure planting success"

Colin Crosbie - Curator RHS Garden Wisley

> How it works
Mycorrhizal fungi do everything plant roots do, but better. When new plants are planted with Rootgrow it takes only 2-4 weeks under normal conditions for these fungi to start benefiting plants. In that time they attach themselves to the plant's root system and grow out rapidly into the soil, searching for nutrients and water. They essentially become part of the plant's own root system.

> Better nutrient uptake
These fungi are so much thinner and finer than the plant's own roots, so can find nutrients in the soil far more efficiently than the plant's own coarse roots. They are especially good at finding nutrients responsible for flowering and fruiting such as phosphorus and potassium. As they can explore a much greater area of soil than the plant's own roots they are also far more likely to find the trace elements and rare nutrients all plants need to grow well.

> Drought tolerance
Mycorrhizal fungi are an essential part of a plant's ability to combat drought. Leaves and stems have developed mechanisms to combat drought such as silver leaves, waxy leaves and hairy leaves but these adaptations on their own aren't enough if the plant doesn't have its friendly fungal partner on its roots. Mycorrhizal fungi hold onto water in soils like a sponge.

> Establishment in difficult soils
Mycorrhizal fungi will enable plants to establish and thrive even in difficult soils. In poor sandy soils the mycorrhizal fungi will be able to find scarce nutrients and hold onto water. In clay soils these fungi will be able to unlock nutrients from the soil acting like a clay breaker.

Usage guidelines:
For a 9cm pot use 5g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 30 plants). For a 2-3 litre pot use 25g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 6 plants). For a 4-5 litre rose use 50g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 3 plants). For a 10-15 litre tree use 50g Rootgrow (a 150g sachet will cover approximately 3 trees).

Empathy is about making a choice to garden with minimal use of chemicals whilst maximising plant growth and health. Empathy products are biological, they will benefit your plants not just over a few months but through their lifetime and are designed to treat the soil as well as the plant. Empathy supports the RHS mission for 'Sharing the best in Gardening'.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Good stuff?

5

Its difficult to review Rootgrow as its obviously not possible to see whether or not it is working! The plants are growing well so I guess its good stuff!

Sheila

Bucks

true

Does as it says

5

Bought a new tree and used this to help it get a good start

Worcesterlass

Worcestershire

true

Long Term effect

4

I always use this whenever planting something that will be there for the long term as this intriduces naturally occurring fungi that lives on the roots of plants and helps them to extract nutrients from the soil for the rest of their lives. Of course, they an do that without adding RootGrow but this accelerates the process. I recently, unfortunately, had to move some bare root hedging plants which had only been in place for 1 year. They were relatively easy to move after just one year but I was amazed by how much fibrous root system the plant had already been able to form.

SteveH

High Wycombe

true

Good Stuff

5

Used this when planting hedge. Has taken really well and is looking pretty good . Its early days ( just 6 months ) planted last June . The plants are looking healthy and strong .

RUTHIE

SOUTH WEST FRANCE

true

Good stuff

4

I think this works but to be honest I can't really prove it!

Hawthorne

South-East Scotland

Rootgrow - licensed by the Royal Horticultural Society

4.6 5

100.0

Can I use this for bare root Tree Peonies?

caicai

Hello there Yes Rootgrow is good to use on bare root plants.

Can you please tell me whether this product will help when potting up fruit trees into larger containers? Many thanks

manicgardener

Hello, Yes, provided it can come into contact with the plants roots, it will be beneficial.

Helen

Hello How many pouches will i need to plant 4 shrubs ? Many thanks

HELEN

Hello, it really depends on how big the plants are. A 150 gram sachet will cover approximately 30 plants in 9cm pots, 6 plants in a 2-3 litre pot or 3 plants in a 10 litre pot.

Helen

Rootgrow when to use? Can you tell me whether Rootgrow has to be used in the hole when you plant out new plants or if can be used on newly planted or established plants. Thanks, Mary

Mary Pooley

Hello Mary, To work effectively, the fungi has to come into direct contact with the roots of the plant. Therefore you should only really use it when planting out new things. If however you have an ailing plant in the garden, you could try planting something next to it using the rootgrow. As it grows the new plants roots may merge into the established plant and the fungi may then attach itself to the older plants roots - but this is a bit hit and miss and will take a long time. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Suggestions for planting low maintenance border please Hello, I recently had my garden extended by a piece of land measuring 34 metres by 14 metres, and my son purchased 23 Phormiums from you in last August on my behalf. I was delighted with the service I received, and the plants appear to be thriving well especially considering the dreadful weather we have suffered this winter. We also bought Rootgrow from you to assist with their development ,and also for use when we moved mature Acers and other shrubs. I still need more shrubs or other types of plants and would appreciate some advice as to what to use. Along one of the 14 metre lengths there is a "hedge" of bamboo plants, and adjacent to these on the return (long) length there is a small rise of earth, tapering down to ground level, with a specimen black bamboo at the end of the mound. There is also a mature acer, which we had to move, situated at the edge of the dividing path (between the lawn) on the field side of the garden. Would it be possible for you to suggest the names of suitable plants which I could purchase from you and which would compliment the existing ones. I am in my eighties and therefore need a very low maintenance garden. I would also like to introduce a little colour if possible. My garden is very exposed and is on quite a windy site. I look forward to your reply.

Marian Burgess

Hello there, There are many plants that might tempt you - here are some of my favourites:- Fatsia japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/fatsia-japonica/classid.3840/ Rodgersia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rodgersia/cat.plants/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/cat.plants/ Hydrangea paniculata http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hydrangea-paniculata/ Aucuba japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/aucuba-japonica/classid.277/ Rosa rugosa Alba http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/roses/shrub-rose/hedging/bush-rose/hedging-rose/other-shrub-rose/rosa-rugosa-alba/classid.1148/ Cotoneaster http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cotoneaster/ Buddleja http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.buddleja/ I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Can I use Rootgrow on established Roses? Can Rootgrow be usefully used on established roses? If not, please could you advise me as to what I should use on them at this time of year, to help next year's flowering? Sarah

Sarah Craig

Thankyou for your suggestion that I apply composted organic matter to my roses. I will do this. Sarah

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello Sarah, Rootgrow should only really be used when you are first planting as it needs to come into contact with the roots. At this time of the year the best thing you can do for established roses is apply a generous layer of composted organic matter as a mulch. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Sarah Craig

Planting climbers

The secret of success when planting a climber is to make sure that the soil is in good heart and the roots are set away from the dry conditions found at the base of a wall. After planting, I also suggest that you cover the surface of the soil with a mulch

Read full article

Planting a tree

The secret to success when planting a tree is to make sure that it is well anchored; with shorter trees careful firming may be sufficient, but for trees over 1.5m a short stake and tree tie will help to keep the root ball in place. After planting, it's a

Read full article

Planting a shrub

Shrubs are vital ingredients in a garden. They provide height, structure and year-round interest - as well as creating a backdrop for many of the showier plants. When it comes to planting a shrub, there are a couple of important points to remember. You wi

Read full article

Planting a hedge

Hedges by their very nature are often planted in exposed positions, so the secret of successful establishment is to make sure that they are well protected from prevailing winds for the first few years. Carefully planting and covering the surface of the so

Read full article