tomato 'Fandango'

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tomato 'Fandango'

1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (1 review) Write review
approx 25 seeds £2.49
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy tomato 'Fandango' tomato / Solanum lycopersicum'Fandango': Shows good resistance to blight
<UL><li><b>Position:</b> full sun<li><b>Soil:</b> humus-rich, moisture retentive soil<BR><BR>This tomato to show resistance to blight, an increasingly common fungal disease that can devastate tomato crops grown outside, particularly in wet summers. This super-reliable variety is also resistant to fusarium and verticillium wilt. Produces heavy crops of medium-sized deep red tomatoes with an excellent flavour: they grow just as well in the greenhouse, too.<BR><BR><li><b>Growing Instructions:</b> Sow in a frost-free greenhouse or windowsill, potting on seedlings individually as they grow. Once all danger of frost has passed, harden plants off and plant outside in rich soil in a sunny spot. Tie in to supports as they grow, keep well-watered and feed weekly with liquid tomato feed once flowers form. To ripen green fruit at the end of the season, cut the whole plant with fruit intact and hang it upside-down in a warm, bright conservatory or greenhouse.<br><br><li><b>Sow:</b> January-March<br><br><li><b>Harvest:</b> July-October<br><br><li><b>Approximate quantity:</b> 25 seeds</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: humus-rich, moisture retentive soil

    This tomato to show resistance to blight, an increasingly common fungal disease that can devastate tomato crops grown outside, particularly in wet summers. This super-reliable variety is also resistant to fusarium and verticillium wilt. Produces heavy crops of medium-sized deep red tomatoes with an excellent flavour: they grow just as well in the greenhouse, too.

  • Growing Instructions: Sow in a frost-free greenhouse or windowsill, potting on seedlings individually as they grow. Once all danger of frost has passed, harden plants off and plant outside in rich soil in a sunny spot. Tie in to supports as they grow, keep well-watered and feed weekly with liquid tomato feed once flowers form. To ripen green fruit at the end of the season, cut the whole plant with fruit intact and hang it upside-down in a warm, bright conservatory or greenhouse.

  • Sow: January-March

  • Harvest: July-October

  • Approximate quantity: 25 seeds

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more info

Eventual height & spread

Recommended

5

It was a slow start for tomatoes in South Yorks this year but they caught up and I picked the last of the crop in early October . Very good yield and the freezer full.

poppull

South Yorks

Yes

2000014723

5.0 1

100.0

Tomato trouble! Hi, Can you get blossom end rot on both ends of the tomato? Mine seem to be going soft at the joined end and then dropping off Thanks love Julie

Julie Losh

Hello Julie, Blossom end rot will only affect the bottom of the tomato, so I suspect yours are suffering from something else. They are prone to a number of things that will make the fruits rot, so I am not really sure what might be causing this with yours. I would remove all the damaged tomatoes as quickly as possible and keep an eye on the watering and air circulation. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Tomatoes not ripening? Hi there, I wonder if you can help. This year I am growing the tomato variety "Shirley" in the greenhouse. They are very healthy and laden with fruit, but they are not ripening. Regards. Kate

kate roberts

Hello Kate, There is something called Dry Set, which means the growth of the tomatoes stops when they are still very small. This is brought about by the air being too hot and dry when pollination is taking place, and the best way to cure this is to mist the plants with water twice a day - in the morning and evening.

Crocus Helpdesk

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