Salvia 'Nachtvlinder'

3 × 9cm pots £20.97 £18.00
in stock (shipped within 3-5 working days)
9cm pot £6.99
in stock (shipped within 3-5 working days)
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Salvia 'Nachtvlinder' salvia: Sumptuous summer colour

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June to August
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (may need winter protection)

    Velvet-like plum-purple petals form hooded flowers over a long period in summer and autumn. Fully hardy in freely draining soils, this bushy shrub will become drought tolerant once established.

  • Garden care: To prolong flowering remove the flower spikes as soon as they start to fade. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant in spring. Protect from excessive cold and waterlogged soils.

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Eventual height & spread

Eventual height and spread
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I would buy this product again

5

It looks lovely and smells lovely

Pleased

London

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Fabulous Salvia

5

A really beautiful salvia, sumptuous dark velvet blooms. Incredibly fragrant, especially when you brush past the foliage. Non fussy, very hardy. Looks fabulous (and beneficial too) when planted under roses.

Experimental Gardener

London

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Fantastic colour!

5

I love this Salvia, it's lovely spilling over the edge of a raised bed and in containers and it's hardier than I thought it would be. Fantastic colour!

Honorine Jobert

Wales

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A bit of a showy thug!

5

I grow this Salvia around my roses, I read on Sarah Raven's website that it helps to stop black spot and it certainly seems to as non of the roses have had black spot. It is a bit of a thug though, and needs cutting back in the autumn (as with me it doesn't die down). The foliage has a most odd smell - but bees like it!

VikingLady

Lincoln

true

truely beautiful colour

5

I didn't manage to kill it over winter which is always a good sign. while its listed as half hardy it survived the winter of 2020 outside. I did wrap the pot in a tarparlin filled with straw and the plant was firmly wraped with fleeze and I removed the snow when ever it settled. so it may be more hardy than you might think. mean while it keeps producing the most lushious deep purple flowers while smelling divine.

bob

hertfordshire

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Smells gorgeous

5

Good strong plants. Velvelty and sultry , smell divine. Planted last autumn, retained their leaves throughout the winter (relatively mild) and about to come back to life now that weather is warming up.

S Lee

London

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Beautiful and tough

5

Nice plants that settled in well. The stems of this salvia tend to be brittle so I broke off a few while I was planting them--not to worry, I pushed them into compost and ended up with about nine extra plants! They have all grown large and remained green through this (admittedly mild) winter. They attract bees, butterflies, and, best of all, hummingbird hawkmoths. Absolutely trouble-free.

Chij

South coast

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Very pleased

5

Planted between lavender shrubs. Looks great and flowered well into autumn.

Hackie

South east

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Simply stunning plant... would highly recommend

5

Great plant... very healthy, grew away quickly. Flowered all summer. Yet to find out if hardy.

Anne McD

Reading

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Established well as companion to roses ( North of England )

5

Companion to roses - long flowering. Does sprawl a bit. Waiting to see how hardy they are.

Northernflyfisher

Berwick upon Tweed

true

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