Rubus phoenicolasius - Japanese wineberry

Rubus phoenicolasius - Japanese wineberry

2 litre pot £12.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><li><b>Position:</b> full sun<li><b>Soil:</b> fertile, well-drained soil<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> fast-growing<li><b>Hardiness:</b> fully hardy<br><br>Still quite rare here in the UK, but hopefully that will all change quite soon. These incredibly sweet, orange red to dark red berries are delicious if picked and eaten straight from the bush when they ripen in August, or can be cooked up in the same way as you would raspberries (which they are closely related to). They come on a large, deciduous bush that is easy to grow, although you will get the best fruit when it is trained against a sunny, south-facing wall or fence.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> Prepare the planting area well, removing all perennial weeds and adding plenty of well-rotted garden compost or manure and plant at 45cm intervals. The fruit is produced on two year old canes, the stems that grow this year, should go on to produce fruit next year. Ideally you should tie the canes onto wires and at the end of the picking season cut those that have produced fruit back to their base and then tie on the new canes.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Still quite rare here in the UK, but hopefully that will all change quite soon. These incredibly sweet, orange red to dark red berries are delicious if picked and eaten straight from the bush when they ripen in August, or can be cooked up in the same way as you would raspberries (which they are closely related to). They come on a large, deciduous bush that is easy to grow, although you will get the best fruit when it is trained against a sunny, south-facing wall or fence.

  • Garden care: Prepare the planting area well, removing all perennial weeds and adding plenty of well-rotted garden compost or manure and plant at 45cm intervals. The fruit is produced on two year old canes, the stems that grow this year, should go on to produce fruit next year. Ideally you should tie the canes onto wires and at the end of the picking season cut those that have produced fruit back to their base and then tie on the new canes.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

"Grow them up against a fence or along a post and wires to create garden divisions"

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusRubus phoenicolasius - Japanese wineberry
 
1.0

(based on 1 review)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

Reviewed by 1 customer

Displaying review 1

Back to top

 
1.0

Probably the worst purchase of my life

By roobix

from London

About Me Master Gardener

Verified Buyer

Pros

    Cons

    • Very poor yield
    • Very thorny

    Best Uses

    • Patio

    Comments about Rubus phoenicolasius - Japanese wineberry:

    There are many reasons why the plant is rare here in the UK!
    The worst feature of the plant is the thorns. They are so sharp, they come through my gardening gloves, and there have been many occasions when the thorns lodged into my hand when I tried to pick berries without gloves.
    The berries are few and far between. I'm writing this in August and though there are clusters of berries, they are not as full as the photos show on the web page.
    Taste wise, they are just ok. They reminded me of pomegranate, but they are not exceptional.
    It is a highly invasive plant.
    I honestly can't think of any redeeming features. Buy a raspberry instead.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced
    • Primary use:
    • Personal

    Displaying review 1

    Back to top

    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    1 Question | 1 Answer
    Displaying question 1
    • Q:

      Fruit canes/bushes

      I am keen to purchase raspberry canes to grow this year. Before I purchase, can you guarantee that your canes are 'virus free'?
      Asked on 7/7/2009 by Carol Fry

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello There, All our fruit is virus free, but certificates are only issued when plants cross borders. We only deliver to mainland UK, so we do not have certificates, but keep in mind that all our hardy plants are also covered by a 1 year guarantee.

        Answered on 8/7/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    Displaying question 1

    Do you have a question about this product? 

    There are currently no articles for this item.