Lamium maculatum 'Beacon Silver'

2 litre pot £8.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Lamium maculatum 'Beacon Silver' dead nettle: Quickly forms a silvery carpet in shade


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained garden soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast
  • Flowering period: May to July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Delicate silver leaves, narrowly edged in green give this lamium an ethereal quality. It quickly forms a silvery carpet of foliage with whorls of long-lasting, nettle-like, magenta flowers in late spring and early summer. A beautiful semi-evergreen groundcover plant that will light up the base of deciduous or even evergreen shrubs and trees. It prefers partial shade, and once established, will even flourish in difficult areas of dry shade.

  • Garden care: If you are growing this in dry shade, keep it well watered until it is established. After it has finished flowering, remove the faded flower heads to encourage fresh new foliage. Lift and divide large clumps in late autumn or early spring.

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Eventual height & spread

"The purple-pink flowers are nothing, but the mound of crisp silver leaves margined in green in winter make this highly desirable - trim back in autumn for maximum effect"

came back from the dead

4

i bought this plan 3 years ago and planted out as per instructions, light shade and good humus rich loam, it did not thrive in fact it seemed to die, left it where it was for a year then during a garden make over I must have dug it up by accident and it ended up in an area sandy soil and full sun. I noted the next year that a "plant" had started growing where I had dug over...within a year it had morphed in a lovely flower covered plant which spread so quickly I managed to split it three times. Already this year all three plants have spread to about 30cm x 30cm and is filling the gaps between them. it seems to be bulletproof flowering through the recent terrible storms. I intend splitting them again this year and filling all the gaps as they are real bee magnets. A garden star in my opinion.

dave

aberdeen

Yes

AMENDMENT

5

I meant bergenias not begonias!!!

amandahorseface

Oxfordshire

Yes

BEAUTIFUL IN SHADE

5

I planted these in a tapestry border which never sees the sun. They have been wonderful, spread to about 80cms in a few weeks and have flowered all winter. The silver leaves are a wonderful foil to hardy geraniums and begonias which grow taller and the pinky purple flowers are very pretty.

amandahorseface

Oxfordshire

Yes

Lamium maculatum'Beacon Silver'

4.7 3

100.0

I have planted 100 bulbs in a garden bed with lavender as a border, but I wondered if 'Beacon silver' could be planted on top of the bulbs to give some ground cover throughout the rest of the year. If not, do you have any recommended plants that I could use as ground cover to prevent children and dogs stomping over this bare area until the spring? Regards, Laura

Laura West

Hello, Yes, the vast majority of bulbs will not have any trouble at all pushing through this, and as it is a fairly robust and fast growing plant, it wont mind the competition.

Helen

Hello, we have an area under a large silver birch which is a obviously dry and shady and I'm looking for some ground cover. To add to the dilemma, there are already lots of beautiful bluebells in the space. Is there anything else I can put in which will not strangle the bluebells? Was thinking maybe lamium, but its peak season may be the same as the bluebells which is not ideal and am worried it will out compete them. At the moment, after May/June, it just runs wild with grassy weeds which are not very attractive. Thanks for any help!

Bluebell

Hello, There are several things that spring to mind - here are some of my favourites... Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/sort.0/ Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/pachysandra-terminalis/classid.3288/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/sort.0/ As for the lamium, this too would be fine as although it flowers at roughly the same time as the bluebells, its attractive foliage remains for the best part of the year in most settings.

Helen

I have been looking for some all year low, ground cover that will tolerate extremely dry soil under a sycamore and a chestnut. I haven not even been able to get shady grass to grow. Ivy and nettles seem to do ok, so something at least grows. Have you any suggestions? It is quite shady but not overly so, soil is mostly clay. I don't mind if it flowers or not, as long as its has some green in winter and I would ideally like it to blend into the lawn where it is patchy near the trees.

AM2012

Hello, Yes, this is a very tricky spot indeed. There are a couple of very tough plants that may be suitable, but even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered until they are well really established. Here are some of the best... Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/sort.0/ Liriope http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.liriope-/sort.0/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.Vinca/sort.0/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/sort.0/ Lamium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.lamium/sort.0/

Helen

Plant suggestions for a child's 'Fairy Garden' Sirs, Having recently cleared and replanted much of my garden my 11 year old daughter has asked for her own plot to create a "fairy garden". I love the idea of her looking after her own area, and she will also help, and have part of the vegetable plot. However I am stuck as to which plants (shrubs, perennials or otherwise) to suggest for the fairy garden. The plot she has selected is above the waterfall. The soil is a little heavy but other than that quite good, but it is in the shade of a large sycamore tree. Can you suggest any shade tolerant plants for this area? In case it helps, it sits next to a Japanese inspired area. The area is approximately 2m square, but if you have any ideas that might need more space that is also OK . Thank you.

Adam Prince

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil underneath the tree. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options Epimedium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.epimedium/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I'm not sure if the fairies will love them, but I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants for a demanding site! Hi We are looking for a ready-made border for a demanding site. The area is in shade with trees, the soil is clay, and is dry in summer and in the winter. We are wanting, if possibly for it to flower in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter! The area to cover is three areas of 5mtrs x 2mtrs - it is a new border, and we want to have some height at the back of the border. Thank you

A Blunt'vyse

Hello There, We do offer a bespoke planting plan service, but this is charged at ??30 per hour - just click on the following link for more information. http://www.crocus.co.uk/design-service/ I'm afraid though, dry shade is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. You should also keep in mind too that to get a really good floral display, you will need to have a more open, sunny spot - think woodland floors that rarely get the sun, which might have ferns and greenery, but very few flowers. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Planting ideas for under large Cedar trees Hi, We have a garden that has about 10 large cedar trees in it. The garden doesn't contain any plants other than a small yew and holly tree. The soil looks acidic. The garden has not been used or maintained for many, many, years hence pine needles, and cones have just been left to rot down. We have cleaned up as much as we can and cut some of the lower branches off the Cedars. Now our problem is what will grow? We need a hedge, preferably evergreen and quick growing (not leylandii). Also we need ground cover, - we would like grass but are unsure whether it will grow. Is there any way we can pretty this garden up with some evergreens and perennials without too much hassle? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Nadine

Philip Cordell

Hello Nadine, I'm afraid it is going to be pretty difficult to get anything to grow under mature Cedars as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/result/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants to replace a lawn Dear Sir I have a small lawn at the front of my garden and want to use plants other than grass. Can you give me some ideas of plants that could give a low effect of green or some planting scheme that would look ok ? Richard

richard wood

Hello Richard, There are loads of things that you could plant in this area - here are some of the best. Pachysandra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/prices-that-have-been-pruned/pachysandra-terminalis-/classid.3288/ Lamium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/lamium-maculatum-beacon-silver/classid.3133/ Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-dammeri-/classid.1021/ Cotoneaster horizontalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-horizontalis-/classid.1028/ Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Liriope http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/liriope-muscari-/classid.3173/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/ Calluna http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.calluna/ Geranium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/mediterranean-plants/geranium-sanguineum-var.-striatum/classid.2000007127/ I hope this gives you a few ideas, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants for under hedges? Hello, I have two hedges that are only a year old - mostly hawthorn, hazel, wild rose and crab apple. A lot of grasses have grown up into and around them. I am about to weed all this out and was wondering what I could plant underneath to prevent the grasses coming up again in the spring. I was having a look at your perennial prism - what would be good to plant now? I live in Scotland so am a bit worried about the frosts. I would like to get something planted before the spring as we will be moving. Many thanks for your help, Jessica

Jessica Harris

Hello Jessica, I'm afraid it is incredibly difficult to get plants to grow under a hedge as the competition for light, water and nutrients is too fierce. Your best bet would be really tough plants, but even these will have a struggle on their hands, and they will not be very colourful. Here are your best options Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Iris foetidissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3073&CategoryID= Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Evergreen ground cover for under trees Hello, I want to under-plant the five silver birches in our back garden. The soil is fairly dry under the trees, clay based, with morning sun on the front edge of the border but otherwise shady. I want an evergreen cover, low maintenance, with foliage rather than flowers. I am thinking about planting solidly with Pachysandra terminalis, with maybe some ferns to provide a bit of height at the base of the fence. Any alternative ideas would be gratefully appreciated. Regards Janette

Janette Gross

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. I like the idea of the Pachysandra and ferns, but you could also consider any of the following. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Dear Helen Thanks for your suggestions. I think I will add in the Liriope in clumps towards the back. Best wishes Janette

Janette Gross

Suggestions for dry shade under a tree Hello, I have a raised bed around the base of a twisted willow about 1.5metres diameter. Currently I have foxgloves, tulips and day lilies growing, which cope, but all flower early in the year. I've yet to find anything that will cope with these conditions that will flower later and keep the bed looking interesting. It gets a little morning sun on one side but is otherwise in the shade all day and is very dry. We live in France and that is not helping as we get very little rain in the summer and it is often very hot. Please can you help? Pauline

Eric and Pauline

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are the best options for UK gardens - I am not sure how they will cope in your French garden. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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