Hypericum × moserianum 'Tricolor'

2 litre pot £12.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Hypericum × moserianum 'Tricolor' St. John's wort: Deep yellow flowers and variegated leaves

This shrub is semi-evergreen, so it can lose some of its leaves in winter. In colder regions or more exposed gardens, it may lose them all, but then fresh new foliage appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moderately-fertile, moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to October
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Masses of cheerful, deep yellow, cup-shaped flowers appear on red stems from July to October among strikingly variegated green, cream and pink leaves. This low, spreading, semi-evergreen shrub makes a valuable groundcover plant where space is limited. Less invasive than the ubiquitous 'rose of Sharon' (Hypericum calcycinum), it grows equally well in sun and shade, but needs protection from cold, drying winds.

  • Garden care: After flowering, lightly trim back shoots that spoil the symmetry of the plant. After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant.

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Colour my world

5

This was a simple addition to my patio area, emits a fragrance which is noticeable, and is highly attractive. It scores on all counts.

nickothecotswolds

Lechlade Gloucestershire

true

Hypericumxmoserianum'Tricolor'

5.0 1

100.0

We have 2 pet rabbits and would like to plant some small shrubs in their run that would not be eaten by them but yet would not be poisonous to them either. Do you have any suggestions?

Jacs

Hello, Your best bet will be to grow plants which are less palatable to rabbits, but please check with your vet first to make sure they are not toxic to them as I have little experience in this field. They tend to prefer leaves and soft stems rather than flowers and woody stems, and they seem to prefer feeding in exposed positions and often nibble plants at the edge of borders. This habit can be used to the gardener's advantage by planting more valuable subjects in the centre of beds. In winter, when food is scarce, deciduous plants at the edge of beds will not interest rabbits, and will help protect winter flowers in the centre. Below is a list of plant which they usually tend to leave alone. Trees and shrubs Aucuba japonica Buddleia davidii, Buxus spp Ceanothus Cistus Cotoneaster dammeri Deutzia Gaultheria procumbens Hebe Hedera Hypericum Hydrangea Mahonia aquifolium Potentilla fructicosa Rhododendron spp Herbaceous perennials and bulbs Alchemilla mollis Anemone blanda A. x hybrida Aquilegia Borago officinalis Convallaria majalis Crocosmia Cyclamen spp Delphinium Galanthus nivalis Hemerocallis Iris Kniphofia Narcissus spp Nepeta Nicotiana spp Ophiopogon planiscapus Osteospermum Paeonia Phormium tenax Potentilla Pulmonaria Symphytum Verbena

Helen

What can I plant? I have a 1 ft wide border of poor quality soil along the edge of a patio which is adjacent to our neighbour's decking. I was wondering whether you could advise what I could plant. Thanks Anna

Anna Trundle

Hello Anna, Ideally you should dig in as much composted organic matter as possible to enrich the soil before you plant, and then (if you don't mind plants spilling out from the border), you could plant any of the following. Lavandula, Hebe, Hypericum or Vinca.

Crocus Helpdesk

What evergreen shub would you recommend? I wonder if you would be good enough to recommend some low(ish) growing, flowering, evergreen shrubs to grow in full sun for part of the day with well drained clay type soil. Kind regards. Keith

keith waters

Hello Keith, There are several lovely plants which spring to mind including Daphne, Hypericum, Rhododendron (the smaller cultivars) and Hebe. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Rabbit proof shrubs Dear Sirs We are planning to plant a 30mt long border with flowering shrubs and have assorted colours of Rhododendrons in mind. Our main concern is that the shrubs must be rabbit proof as the border is adjacent to woods and a large grassed area. Also, where possible we would like to have 'flowers' on the shrubs throughout the summer. Would you be able to provide a picking list of suitable shrubs? Thank you for your prompt attention Andy

Clark, Andy (buying)

Hello there, These are really troublesome pests, and there are no effective deterrents available (apart from getting a guard dog) which will be any help to you. They tend to prefer leaves and soft stems rather than flowers and woody stems, and they seem to prefer feeding in exposed positions and often nibble plants at the edge of borders. This habit can be used to the gardener's advantage by planting more valuable subjects in the centre of beds. In winter, when food is scarce, deciduous plants at the edge of beds will not interest rabbits, and will help protect winter flowers in the centre. Below is a list of flowering shrubs which they usually tend to leave alone. Buddleia davidii, Ceanothus Cistus Cotoneaster dammeri Deutzia Hebe Hypericum Hydrangea Mahonia aquifolium Potentilla fructicosa Rhododendron spp. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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