Geranium 'Ann Folkard'

9cm pot £6.49
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Geranium 'Ann Folkard' cranesbill: A wonderful ground-covering perennial

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: vigorous
  • Flowering period: July to October
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Vivid magenta, saucer-shaped flowers, each with a near-black eye and veining, appear in profusion on the long, scrambling stems from midsummer to mid-autumn. The foliage, which emerges yellowish-green, darkens as it matures, forming an attractive contrast.

  • Garden care: In autumn, rejuvenate plants that are beginning to look jaded by removing old flowered stems and leaves.

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more info

Eventual height & spread

Tough plant

5

This was an addition to the herbaceous border. I planted it at the beginning of the hot 2018 summer and kept forgetting to water it. Amazingly it survived and flowered well into the autumn. Impressive. Very bright flowers.

Maurice

Gloucester

true

A lovelyl little plant that is not easy to find normally!

4

Now geraniums are normally really hardy, but this is my second one and it's struggling with the heat and the previous one disliked the dryness. I've been wanting to grow this in the southeast as it grows marvelously well in Wales on a wall which suits its lax habit. Beautiful magenta colour with a black eye

Jools

Burnham

true

Great plant for ground covder

5

Bought as part of a pink/white border. Added to previous years geranium collection. Easy to grow and has survived hard winter. Great plant delivered in great condition.

Jane

Malvern

true

One of my favourite geraniums

5

This geranium is not only gorgeous to look at it, it is versatile too in that it will thrive in shade or sun and makes excellent ground cover.

Birdwatcher

Isle of Wight

true

Healthy plant

4

This is a great plant for growing and twining amongst other plants. It is easy to grow and flowers from May to October.

Korky

Darlington, northeast England

true

Lovely vivid flowers

4

I planted in my garden last summer and am looking forward to it putting on growth this year. Hopefully!

Karen

Cornwall

true

Geranium Ann Folkard

4

It is a very attractive geranium though I am sad to say my plants did not flourish

C

London SW13

Excellent all rounder

5

I've used for ground cover, but also in containers, spectacular year after year. Long flowering season.

Moo

Dorset

true

2000010682

4.5 8

100.0

Dear Crocus, I will appreciate your help about the question placed below. I have a big pot outside, in the patio area, in front of a fence and between a bedroom's window and a medium size shed, what can I plant there? Thanks for your advice.

Sanya

Hello, If the pot is in partial shade, you could consider Hydrangea macrophylla 'Black Steel Zambia' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hydrangea-macrophylla-black-steel-zambia/classid.2000014389/ or Fuchsia Deltas Sarah http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/fuchsia-deltas-sara/classid.2000015644/ or if it gets lots of sun Cistus × argenteus 'Silver Pink' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/cistus--argenteus-silver-pink/classid.840/ or Rosmarinus officinalis 'Miss Jessopp's Upright' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/rosmarinus-officinalis-miss-jessopps-upright/classid.1960/

helen

Plant advice for 2 new beds please Hello, I need some help to decide which plants to put into two new areas please:- 1: A semi-circle flash bed at the front of the house, size approx 2m x 0.80m and 0.80m deep. I thought about the 3 following options for a small tree/bush in the middle:- a) Magnolia soulangeana, but I was worried about the size that it could grow to and possible problems with roots etc . Will it stay small if the size of the container is used to restrict it? b) Witch Hazel (Hamamelis intermediana 'Diane'). Will it spread too much? I think this is very pretty. c) Corylus avellana 'contorta' Then I also need to think about ground cover plants to help suppress weeds. I am only interested in fully hardy, easy to look after plants, could be with some flowers or coloured leaves. 2:- A thin path between neighbours (approx 2m x 0.40). My idea is to plant bamboo. I would love a modern thin run of bamboo with ground cover. My worry is which bamboos to use. I love the yellow, like Phyllostychys aureocaulis (Golden Grove) but not sure if it is strong enough as it could be exposed to some wind. I bought from you a couple of years ago the Phyllostychys aureosulcata 'Spectabilis' which I planted in pots but it died this year. I see on your website some other bamboos but I don't like them as much as their canes seems less exposed and have a lot more foliage. But possibly these would be a better alternative... ...? For the ground cover I as thinking of Ophiopogen nigrescen. Do you think these plants will be suitable, or have you any other suggestions? Thank you for your help, Galia

e moran

Hello Galia, All of the taller shrubs you mentioned for the semi-circular bed will get quite large, but their growth will be restricted (both in height and spread) if they are kept in a pot where their roots are restricted. For groundcover you could opt for any of the following:- Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/ Epimedium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.epimedium/ Geranium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.geranium/ Erica http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.erica/ As for the bamboos, even the most well behaved one (Fargesia murieliae) will spread to around 1.5m across so you should keep this in mind when planting it in such a confined space. Perhaps a better option would be one of our hedging plants, which can be cut back hard against the wall. Taxus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/trees/hedging/conifer/bigger-trees/best-in-very-large-gardens-parks/taxus-baccata-/classid.6230/ or Ligustrum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/hedging/ligustrum-ovalifolium-/classid.4093/ would be good options. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Is it still ok to be cutting back herbaceous perennials, Lavender and Caryopteris late in the year? Dear Crocus, I didn't have time to cut back to ground level all my herbaceous perennial plants and some shrubs in the autumn, due to work and family commitments. It's difficult to get out into the garden just now as I only have a little time at the weekend. Would it be too late for me to cut everything back still between now in December and the end of February e.g hardy Geraniums, Hostas,etc. and shrubs like Lavenders and Caryopteris? I really would appreciate your advice. Many thanks Pamela

Pamela Spiers

Hello Pamela, You can do the herbaceous perennials anytime between now and spring, but the Caryopteris and Lavenders should be tackled in spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Hi Helen, Thank you for your helpful information. The snow made the decision for me, it has lain for 4 weeks now. Kind Regards Pamela

Pamela Spiers

Plants for outside my front door Hi Crocus I live in a flat and have pots outside my external front door. What plants can I grow in pots, in semi shade that will attract the bees? Thank you for your help. Kind regards Guy

Guy Smith

Hello Guy, The following plants would be suitable for your pots. Forget-me-not (Myosotis species) Bellflowers (Campanula species) Cranesbill (Geranium species) Dahlia - single-flowered species and cultivars Hellebores (Helleborus species) Japanese anemone (Anemone ?? hybrida) Fritillaries (Fritillaria species) Grape hyacinth (Muscari species) Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) Box (Buxus sempervirens) Christmas box (Sarcococca species) I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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