Crataegus laevigata 'Rosea Flore Pleno'

10 lt pot (1.5-1.8m) £74.99
within 2 weeks
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Buy Crataegus laevigata 'Rosea Flore Pleno' midland hawthorn: Lovely double pink flowers

This tree is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: all soils except waterlogged
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: March to May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A small thorny, deciduous tree with shallow, three-to five-lobed, mid-green leaves. In spring, double pink flowers are produced often followed by bright red fruit which is harmful if eaten. A good small tree for all gardens, as it is tough enough to stand exposed sites, city pollution and even costal conditions, while also having ornamental value too.

  • Garden care: Requires minimal pruning. Remove any broken, diseased or crossing branches in late autumn or winter. When planting incorporate lots of well-rotted garden compost in the planting hole and stake firmly.

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Crataegus laevigata'Rosea Florea Pleno'

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Why has my 2 year old hawthorn tree not got any flowers for second year. lynch

Linch

Hello, It is not uncommon for plants not to produce flowers in their first year after planting, as their energy is usually diverted into producing root and leaf growth. After the initial settling in period, you should expect to see flowers in most circumstances, but there are a couple of reasons why you might not. The first is that the plant is not getting enough sun, and the second is a lack of either water or nutrients. If you are happy with the light levels the plant receives, then give it a good feed with a good, general-purpose fertiliser and make sure it is kept well watered during dry spells. You can also give it a bit of a push by giving it a feed with sulphate of potash.

Helen

Hawthorn Tree problem Hi There I purchased a Midland Hawthorn from you in April 2008. It was thriving well until June of this year but in the last 6 weeks has deteriorated fast to a poor looking near dead specimen. I am concerned that it could be Fire Blight. Can you help please as I'm not sure what to do next. Regards Barbara

Hello Barbara, It is difficult to see clearly in the picture, but you should be able to tell if it is fireblight if there are flattened areas of bark that may exude slime. I am not convinced it is though as it will often affect one branch at a time and the leaves look quite spotty in places. I'm afraid though that I have not been able to determine exactly what it could be, so check it over for any untoward signs of pests and diseases or signs of tampering. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

The leaves on my Hawthorn are looking brown I have a Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata Rosea Florea Pleno) and I am concerned about the foliage, which has started to go brown. I have only recently planted it. What do you think I should do, if anything? I look forward to hearing from you. Regards Ian

Ian Butterworth

Hello Ian, It sounds as if the plant has become too dry at some point. A newly planted tree will need to be kept really well watered, especially if it has to compete with its neighbours. Make sure it gets a thorough soak and then is allowed to get a little dry before repeating the process again and it should be fine if the browning is not too severe. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

Help with creating a windbreak I live in Scotland and during the last weekend an old lilac bush blew down. The garden is small and north facing and is very exposed. I am at a loss as to what to plant as very little survives in the wind.

S A Morgan-Jones

Exposed gardens like yours do present a problem so the best thing to do is to plant a windbreak which will act as a shelter for other plants within the garden. This will then widen the choice of plants that you can use. Here's a list of large windbreak plants that can be used as the first line of defence. Hawthorn http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=crataegus Sycamore http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=acer+pseudoplatanus In front of these, it is a good idea to plant tough evergreen shrubs to further cut down the wind and provide and attractive background for the 'real' plants - here are some of the best. Prunus laurocerasus Rotundifolia http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/hedging/prunus-laurocerasus-rotundifolia/classid.4306/ Prunus lusitanica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/hedging/prunus-lusitanica-/classid.4309/ Mahonia http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=mahonia Once these have established and cut down the wind, you can plant almost any type of plant you want.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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