Cosmos atrosanguineus

9cm pot £6.49
in stock
3 × 9cm pots £20.97 £18.00
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Cosmos atrosanguineus chocolate cosmos: Deep red, chocolate-scented flowers

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

    • Position: full sun
    • Soil: moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil
    • Rate of growth: average
    • Flowering period: June to September
    • Hardiness: half hardy

      These velvety, dahlia-like, chocolate-maroon flowers have a delicious aroma, reminiscent of the best Belgian chocolates. One of our recommended plants, they're particularly suitable for a sunny, exotic garden or a planting scheme based on 'hot' colours.

    • Garden care: In autumn after the foliage has died back, reduce the stems to within 5cm (2in) of the roots. Lay in a tray of soil or compost and over-winter in a frost-free environment until early spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Cosmos atrosanguineus

"Sultry chocolate-scented blooms in deepest blood-red in late summer -treat as tuberous dahlia - and inhale regularly"

Really Pretty

5

I chose this pretty plant for its colour and growing habit. It flowered profusely throughout the summer and added great interest to my flower border.

Avdav

London

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Beautiful, unusual colour and fab scent

5

Lovely plant, very free flowering.

LG

Bath

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Chocolate scent

5

I had these in a sunny spot, they bloomed all summer. I hope they survived the cold winter!

MG

Oxford

true

I would hesitate to buy this plant again

1

I love 'choc' cosmos, but this one wasn't at all happy in my garden

kate hedgehog

south west

false

I would recommend this product

4

Planted this in my cottage style garden in early summer and after a slow start it flowered prolifically in late summer and well into autumn. Lovely chocolately colour and a delicious scent!

Jayce

Greater Manchester

true

2000010615

4.0 5

80.0

I just bought my first Chocolate cosmos and plan on keeping it in a pot year round. Are they better off potted or planted? Or does it even matter. Also what kind of food is best for them?

Susan

Hello there These plants can be grown in pots or planted in the ground, but as they are not fully hardy often it is better to grow them in pots as then they are easier to protect from frosts. If you grow in the ground you will need to lift them in the autumn, dry the tubers in a frost free place for a few days, then lay them out in some compost in trays and over winter in a frost free spot. If they are growing in pots you can move them into a frost free greenhouse, or to a sheltered area in the garden and protect them with a frost fleece. I would feed with a balanced liquid fertiliser like Miracle-Gro.

I am thinking of purchasing some Chocolate Cosmos, as it is late in the year how would you recommend that I over winter them?

Jobslot

Hello, We recommend that in autumn after the foliage has died back, cut back the stems to within 5cm (2in) of the roots and lay them in a tray of soil or compost and over-winter in a frost-free environment (like a greenhouse) until early spring.

Helen

I have just received delivery of 3 cosmos atrosanguineus, but there are no growing instructions. Can I put them straight into the garden now or do I need to pot them on into larger pots + keep them in the cold frame for a few weeks? Many thanks.

Pickle

Hello, These can be planted out or potting up, but if you do plant them straight out, make sure there are no more frosts forecast in your area, and protect the newly emerging growth from slugs and snails.

Helen

Hello I bought 3 chocolate cosmos from Crocus which were delivered in August. They are in my conservatory and still growing and flowering. However, the leaves and stems seem to be developing what looks like mildew. Do I spray them with a fungicide or cut off all the top growth, continue to keep them in my cool conservatory and just ensure the pots dont dry out? What do you suggest?

Kitten

Hello there Even though Cosmos atrosanguineus are classed as half hardy, these are garden plants and won't like being indoors as they become more prone to pests and disease. I would put them into a frost free greenhouse, or a sheltered part of the garden where they won't get frosted and let them dieback naturally. Then once foliage has died, cut them right back and dispose of the infected stems and foliage. Hope this helps

I bought a Chocolate Cosmos from you about 6 weeks ago. It is not showing any signs of sprouting. I planted it out last week having had it in the greenhouse until then. When will it start into growth please.

Jennywren

Hello there Plants are just starting to emerge from their dormancy, but I would give it another 4-6 weeks. If it still hasn't shown any signs of new growth by then please come back to us. Hope this helps.

Is Cosmos atrosanguineus perennial, please

Norma

Hello there Yes Cosmos atrosanguineus is a perennial. Hope this helps.

is Cosmos of the daisy family or Daliah family?

Justpeggy

Hello there Cosmos is from the Asteraceae family which includes Dahlias and daisies like the Aster, or Leucanthemum. Hope this helps.

Over wintering Chocolate Cosmos Hello, I wonder if you can advise me on over wintering my Chocolate Cosmos...last year I left three in the ground but only one survived. I don't seem to have any success leaving them in pots, and have tried leaving them in the garage and the shed but they seem to dry out. I have another three to over winter this year, and do not want to lose them again. Your advice would be very much appreciated Many thanks Shirley

I have had success with overwintering cosmos in a sheltered gsrden . Try a thick compost mulch and/or a cloche? Good luck.

Liz

Hello Shirley, All plants need light and water if they are to survive, so leaving them in a shed is not ideal. The chocolate cosmos are not hardy, so will need protection from the cold. You need to find a spot that is sunny and bright, but protected from the worst of the winter, and where you can get to them to water. A greenhouse or conservatory is ideal. Alternatively you could leave them in pots and cover them with fleece and hope it doesn't get too cold. They won't however be happy indoors as the central heating and low light levels will not agree with them. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

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