Cornus florida

12lt pot (0.8-1m) £79.99
available to order from autumn
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Cornus florida flowering dogwood: Rich autumnal foliage

This shrub is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun to part shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, well-drained, neutral to acid soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Tiny, yellow-tipped, green flowers in May, surrounded by white or pink flower bracts, and curled mid-green leaves turning red-purple in autumn. This conical, deciduous tree or shrub thrives in fertile, humus-rich, neutral to acid soil. Unsuitable for shallow, chalky soils, it's an excellent specimen tree for a small sunny garden.

  • Garden care: Incorporate a quantity of composted pine needles or well-rotted leaf mould when planting. Requires minimal pruning.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
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more info

Eventual height & spread

Quality Shrub

5

Excellent quality shrub, which has settled down well this year. Delivery was efficient with the shrub well packaged , for transit.

Willo

SW Scotland

true

Lovely small tree

5

Please don't be put off this tree by the one negative review. It is rather special and greatly admired!

Aly

Sussex

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2000012904

5.0 2

100.0

We have a Cornus Florida and the leaves are gradually turning brown and dying. Is this due to the current hot weather, we are south facing, or could the plant be diseased?

Hopeful Gardener

Hello, The most likely cause is the hot weather and lack of water, although these plants are also susceptible to cornus anthracnose, but this is usually more noticeable during wet weather.

Helen

Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub.... Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret

D DRAKETT

Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

Can I prune my dogwood now? I have a small Cornus florida that was planted in the Autumn. It is bushier than I would like as I want a tree rather than shrub. Its starting to bud now and I probably should have pruned it in the winter, but is it too late now?

Richard Stanaro

Ideally you should prune this Cornus in late winter or early spring. However you may still get away with it if you do it very soon. Just cut back the branches you don't want by pruning to an outward facing bud.

Crocus

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