Clematis alpina

alpine clematis (group 1)

5 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (3 reviews) Write review
2 lt pot (60cm cane) £14.99
available to order from summer
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Clematis alpina alpine clematis (group 1): Delightful mid-blue, bell-shaped flowers in April/May

This climber is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil, neutral soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast
  • Flowering period: April to May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Small, bell-shaped, mid-blue spring flowers with creamy-white centres, followed by fluffy seed-heads, and mid-green leaves. This early spring flowering clematis is ideal for a north- or east-facing site. Given suitable support it may be grown on its own or allowed to scramble through a strong shrub or tree.

  • Garden care: No routine pruning is necessary. If the spread of the plant needs to be restricted prune immediately after flowering, cutting back overlong shoots to healthy buds. Apply a slow-release balanced fertiliser and a mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the base of the plant in early spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Happy customer

5

Planted in May to provide a flowering screen in windy spot and for easy maintenance. established quickly and even flowered same season.

Tinks

Kent

true

Perfect plant for my shed

5

Arrived in good condition and has flourished since planting.

Workuss

Cambridge

true

very succesful

5

Clematis Alpina has grown for many years in a very exposed position. We live on the Pennines and the garden is very windy and wet. The flowers are delightful every spring bringing colour and charm.

Lizzy

Pennines

true

855

5.0 3

100.0

Hello, please can you help me to choose between this one and Frances Rivis? Is it the case that one is better than the other for sun/shade, or what other differences should I think about? I have a number of positions in mind (new garden, bare fences all the way round.) Thanks

parsnip

Hello there Both of these clematis are very similar, both are alpine forms that are tough, and good for cold areas but Clematis 'Frances Rivis' has an RHS AGM.

Which Honeysuckle or Clematis is best for an arch? Hi Do you know which Honeysuckle or Clematis is best for an arch? Many thanks

R.Lawrence

Hello there, All the honeysuckles are quite vigorous, so unless you have a massive arch, you should opt for a more compact type like Lonicera x brownii 'Dropmore Scarlet' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/honeysuckle/lonicera-%C3%97-brownii-dropmore-scarlet/classid.1687/ As for the Clematis, again you should refer to the eventual heights and spreads on our site and choose ones that won't swamp the arches for example C. alpina http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/bell-shaped-flowers/clematis-alpina-/classid.855/ C. Arabella http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/clematis-arabella/classid.2000004765/ or C. Cassis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/normal-flowers/clematis-cassis-=-evipo020-pbr/classid.2000007720/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello there, All the honeysuckles are quite vigorous, so unless you have a massive arch, you should opt for a more compact type like Lonicera x brownii 'Dropmore Scarlet' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/honeysuckle/lonicera-%C3%97-brownii-dropmore-scarlet/classid.1687/ As for the Clematis, again you should refer to the eventual heights and spreads on our site and choose ones that won't swamp the arches for example C. alpina http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/bell-shaped-flowers/clematis-alpina-/classid.855/ C. Arabella http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/clematis-arabella/classid.2000004765/ or C. Cassis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/normal-flowers/clematis-cassis-=-evipo020-pbr/classid.2000007720/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

R.Lawrence

Climber to cover fence and compliment one of your 'Ready Made Borders' Hi, I'm interested in ordering the plants in your 'Keep it Cool' border, but as I plan to plant this against a dark wooden fence, please can you advise a selection of climbing plants which would be in keeping with the border, which would successfully cover the fence. The length of the border is 3.5 metres and it is north facing in a sheltered town garden. I look forward to hearing from you. Regards Jo

Jo Olliver

Hello Jo, You could include a Clematis alpina for early cover http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/bell-shaped-flowers/clematis-alpina-/classid.855/ and a later flowering Clematis such as http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/clematis/normal-flowers/clematis-%C3%A9toile-violette/classid.925/ It is worth keeping in mind though that this border will prefer a spot with lots of sun. Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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