The original copper slug rings - 6 pack

17.5cm - pack of 6 £26.99
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Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy The original copper slug rings - 6 pack: Plants are at their most vulnerable when thay are young and succulent, so the earlier they are protected the better. For insurance, we put slug rings around our bean when we sow the seeds, and around the delphiniums in spring before new growth starts.<BR><li>If you need a bigger ring you can open two large rings, bend them to a larger diameter, and join them nose to tail.<li>After a a few weeks exposure to weather, especiallly rain, slug rings take on a brown patina to blend comfortably into your garden. Slug rings are equally effective whether they are shiny and new, with a brown patina, or even ancient green.<li>Slug Rings are the original patented copper rings - designed and manufactured by gardeners for gardeners.<li> Slug Rings are simple to use, and because they have rounded edges and no sharp corners they are comfortable to handle even for elderly gardeners, and safe around children.<BR><BR>Instructions:<BR><BR><li>Press the slug ring into the soil around the plant.<li>Make sure that there are no slugs or snails trapped inside. Have a good root around to be certain, because they won't be able to get out. In the 1st few days check that you didnt miss any.<li>The rings are scrunched into the soil a little way to no gaps underneath for a slug to sneak through. Wet the soil first if it is too hard.<li>There are no leaves overhanging the ring and touching the soil to make a bridge for slugs and snails to cross.<li>Foliage doesnt overhang the ring from outside, allowing snails to abseil in.<P> To take the slug ring off a climber, or a plant which has grown very bushy, rotate the ring to a convenient position, pull the join apart and open the ring enough to clear the plant. Then gently and firmly push the join back together(It can be easier to put one corner of the tongue in first).<BR><BR>

Plants are at their most vulnerable when thay are young and succulent, so the earlier they are protected the better. For insurance, we put slug rings around our bean when we sow the seeds, and around the delphiniums in spring before new growth starts.

  • If you need a bigger ring you can open two large rings, bend them to a larger diameter, and join them nose to tail.
  • After a a few weeks exposure to weather, especiallly rain, slug rings take on a brown patina to blend comfortably into your garden. Slug rings are equally effective whether they are shiny and new, with a brown patina, or even ancient green.
  • Slug Rings are the original patented copper rings - designed and manufactured by gardeners for gardeners.
  • Slug Rings are simple to use, and because they have rounded edges and no sharp corners they are comfortable to handle even for elderly gardeners, and safe around children.

    Instructions:

  • Press the slug ring into the soil around the plant.
  • Make sure that there are no slugs or snails trapped inside. Have a good root around to be certain, because they won't be able to get out. In the 1st few days check that you didnt miss any.
  • The rings are scrunched into the soil a little way to no gaps underneath for a slug to sneak through. Wet the soil first if it is too hard.
  • There are no leaves overhanging the ring and touching the soil to make a bridge for slugs and snails to cross.
  • Foliage doesnt overhang the ring from outside, allowing snails to abseil in.

    To take the slug ring off a climber, or a plant which has grown very bushy, rotate the ring to a convenient position, pull the join apart and open the ring enough to clear the plant. Then gently and firmly push the join back together(It can be easier to put one corner of the tongue in first).

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