360g pack £9.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy RHS Rootgrow: <b> The first and currently the only plant or soil treatment to be licensed by The Royal Horticultural Society.</b><br><br>RHS gardeners find plants treated with Rootgrow:<ul> <li>Have superior plant establishment with better natural vigour</li> <li>Overcome re-plant problems more successfully</li> <li>Have better developed root systems</li> <li>Are better able to cope with conditions of drought</li> <li>Are supported for their entire lifetime after a single application.</li></ul><strong>"At RHS Garden Wisley, we use Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi when planting trees and shrubs and we are now starting to use it when planting perennials. For me, using rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi has become one of the most important ingredients to ensure planting success" <p>Colin Crosbie - Curator RHS Garden Wisley</strong><P><br><br><b>> How it works</b><br>Mycorrhizal fungi do everything plant roots do, but better. When new plants are planted with Rootgrow it takes only 2-4 weeks under normal conditions for these fungi to start benefiting plants. In that time they attach themselves to the plant's root system and grow out rapidly into the soil, searching for nutrients and water. They essentially become part of the plant's own root system.<br><br><b>> Better nutrient uptake</b><br>These fungi are so much thinner and finer than the plant's own roots, so can find nutrients in the soil far more efficiently than the plant's own coarse roots. They are especially good at finding nutrients responsible for flowering and fruiting such as phosphorus and potassium. As they can explore a much greater area of soil than the plant's own roots they are also far more likely to find the trace elements and rare nutrients all plants need to grow well.<br><br><b>> Drought tolerance</b><br>Mycorrhizal fungi are an essential part of a plant's ability to combat drought. Leaves and stems have developed mechanisms to combat drought such as silver leaves, waxy leaves and hairy leaves but these adaptations on their own aren't enough if the plant doesn't have its friendly fungal partner on its roots. Mycorrhizal fungi hold onto water in soils like a sponge.<br><br><b>> Establishment in difficult soils</b><br> Mycorrhizal fungi will enable plants to establish and thrive even in difficult soils. In poor sandy soils the mycorrhizal fungi will be able to find scarce nutrients and hold onto water. In clay soils these fungi will be able to unlock nutrients from the soil acting like a clay breaker.<br><br><b>Usage guidelines:</b><br>For a 9cm pot use 5g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 72 plants). For a 2-3 litre pot use 25g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 18 plants). For a 4-5 litre rose use 50g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 9 plants. For a 10-15 litre tree use 50g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 5 plants).<br><br>Empathy is about making a choice to garden with minimal use of chemicals whilst maximising plant growth and health. Empathy products are biological, they will benefit your plants not just over a few months but through their lifetime and are designed to treat the soil as well as the plant. Empathy supports the RHS mission for 'Sharing the best in Gardening'.

The first and currently the only plant or soil treatment to be licensed by The Royal Horticultural Society.

RHS gardeners find plants treated with Rootgrow:

  • Have superior plant establishment with better natural vigour
  • Overcome re-plant problems more successfully
  • Have better developed root systems
  • Are better able to cope with conditions of drought
  • Are supported for their entire lifetime after a single application.
"At RHS Garden Wisley, we use Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi when planting trees and shrubs and we are now starting to use it when planting perennials. For me, using rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi has become one of the most important ingredients to ensure planting success"

Colin Crosbie - Curator RHS Garden Wisley



> How it works
Mycorrhizal fungi do everything plant roots do, but better. When new plants are planted with Rootgrow it takes only 2-4 weeks under normal conditions for these fungi to start benefiting plants. In that time they attach themselves to the plant's root system and grow out rapidly into the soil, searching for nutrients and water. They essentially become part of the plant's own root system.

> Better nutrient uptake
These fungi are so much thinner and finer than the plant's own roots, so can find nutrients in the soil far more efficiently than the plant's own coarse roots. They are especially good at finding nutrients responsible for flowering and fruiting such as phosphorus and potassium. As they can explore a much greater area of soil than the plant's own roots they are also far more likely to find the trace elements and rare nutrients all plants need to grow well.

> Drought tolerance
Mycorrhizal fungi are an essential part of a plant's ability to combat drought. Leaves and stems have developed mechanisms to combat drought such as silver leaves, waxy leaves and hairy leaves but these adaptations on their own aren't enough if the plant doesn't have its friendly fungal partner on its roots. Mycorrhizal fungi hold onto water in soils like a sponge.

> Establishment in difficult soils
Mycorrhizal fungi will enable plants to establish and thrive even in difficult soils. In poor sandy soils the mycorrhizal fungi will be able to find scarce nutrients and hold onto water. In clay soils these fungi will be able to unlock nutrients from the soil acting like a clay breaker.

Usage guidelines:
For a 9cm pot use 5g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 72 plants). For a 2-3 litre pot use 25g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 18 plants). For a 4-5 litre rose use 50g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 9 plants. For a 10-15 litre tree use 50g Rootgrow (a 360g sachet will cover approximately 5 plants).

Empathy is about making a choice to garden with minimal use of chemicals whilst maximising plant growth and health. Empathy products are biological, they will benefit your plants not just over a few months but through their lifetime and are designed to treat the soil as well as the plant. Empathy supports the RHS mission for 'Sharing the best in Gardening'.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Excellent product

5

I always use this when planting shrubs and perennials as I am sure it gives the plants a good start

21celsius

London

true

I would buy this product again

4

Seems to have done the job for most new plants

Getupngrow

Cotswolds

true

I would buy this product again

5

All the plants planted with this product all seem to be flourishing and look very healthy

J9

Mid Sussex

true

shows with top growth

5

I was initially sceptical; but ate my words when I saw the results. Even the foliage seemed to be stronger and a more vibrant colour. When transplanting the results were plain to see

barryp

Southam

true

Highly recommended

5

Easy to use and dramatically aids new plants to establish. Use over whole garden or previous plants only. Fungus will eventually spread and benefit neighbouring plants.

Stick

Gloucestershire

true

It does what it says

5

apply recommended dose to roots before planting.Ideal for replanting roses in old rose beds.It gets around rose bed sickness,highly recommended

Dave

Chichester

true

Root growth

5

I am convinced that this product gives plants a real boost when used as directed.

Liz

Essex

true

A must for planting up!

5

I absolutely love this stuff and never plant up without it. The benefits to plants are proven and with only one treatment required for the entire life of the plant it's excellent value. I must admit I don't both using the measuring scoop, I just shake in enough to lightly cover the bottom of the hole and also sometimes rub a bit on the sides of the root ball as well. I actually did my own trial with it a few years ago using some annuals. I divided them into two groups with the only difference being one group had Rootgrow and the other didn't. Pot sizes, feeding, light, moisture, species, etc were exactly the same. The plants that had the Rootgrow ended up superior in every way, and some of them had roots so thick that I needed to use a lot of force to get my plant labelling sticks back into the pots!

Matt

Manchester

true

This really works

5

Open packet, stand it in an empty heavy plant pot, use a scoop or old spoon to apply then it doesn't stick to your damp gloves

stony gardener

Arnside

true

Rootgrow - licensed by the Royal Horticultural Society

4.9 9

100.0

how much rootgrow in the hole of plantation for one bare root rose ? thank you for answer. Maurice

pluck

Hello, One 60g pouch will be sufficient for one or two roses. Ideally though it should be sprinkled onto the roots of the plant rather than the bottom of the hole.

Helen

We are wanting to plant strawberry runners in a bed where strawberries are to be removed from-will rootgrow enable us to do this?Normally I don't think you can grow the same crops in the same soil-but we have no other space.

greyeast

Hello there Ideally it is best to rotate your crops to reduce the likelihood of soil diseases and pests. Rootgrow will help the roots of the strawberries to establish, but it is unlikely to ward against disease etc. Hope this helps

Should you use it for perennials that are happy in a poor soil such as grasses?

Polly

Hello, You can indeed use Rootgrow for all plants as it does not contain any nutrients.

helen

I'm considering purchasing a ready made border - Cottage Garden(30 plants) - how much Rootgrow would I need for planting this border?

Greenpinkies

Hello, As most of the plants are in 2-litre pots, you will need 2 x 360g pouches of Rootgrow. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/rootgrow-licensed-by-the-royal-horticultural-society/classid.2000012047/

helen

when planting new plants with root grow should I also use blood, fish and bone in the planting hole at the same time? thanks

chinalady

Hello there I would use either the Rootgrow, or the blood, fish and bone but not both. Hope this helps

Can Rootgrow be used as a root growing hormone to aid the growth of root from a cut stem?

ally

Hello, If you want to encourage root development on your cuttings, you will need hormone rooting powder. Rootgrow is something else altogether and should only be used when planting things with an established root system.

helen

We are moving a mature productive espaliered apple tree (cox type) from one allotment to another. We are ready to go would rootgrow help it to thrive? Any other tips please?

plotty

Hello, It is always difficult to move established plants as they usually suffer from some root damage. I would definitely recommended using Rootgrow, and try to dig up as much of the root ball as possible. Have the new spot ready, with lots of composted organic matter dug in and plant it immediately. Make sure it is kept really well watered for the first year afterwards and it may survive the shock.

Helen

Rootgrow when to use? Can you tell me whether Rootgrow has to be used in the hole when you plant out new plants or if can be used on newly planted or established plants. Thanks, Mary

Mary Pooley

Hello Mary, To work effectively, the fungi has to come into direct contact with the roots of the plant. Therefore you should only really use it when planting out new things. If however you have an ailing plant in the garden, you could try planting something next to it using the rootgrow. As it grows the new plants roots may merge into the established plant and the fungi may then attach itself to the older plants roots - but this is a bit hit and miss and will take a long time. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Suggestions for planting low maintenance border please Hello, I recently had my garden extended by a piece of land measuring 34 metres by 14 metres, and my son purchased 23 Phormiums from you in last August on my behalf. I was delighted with the service I received, and the plants appear to be thriving well especially considering the dreadful weather we have suffered this winter. We also bought Rootgrow from you to assist with their development ,and also for use when we moved mature Acers and other shrubs. I still need more shrubs or other types of plants and would appreciate some advice as to what to use. Along one of the 14 metre lengths there is a "hedge" of bamboo plants, and adjacent to these on the return (long) length there is a small rise of earth, tapering down to ground level, with a specimen black bamboo at the end of the mound. There is also a mature acer, which we had to move, situated at the edge of the dividing path (between the lawn) on the field side of the garden. Would it be possible for you to suggest the names of suitable plants which I could purchase from you and which would compliment the existing ones. I am in my eighties and therefore need a very low maintenance garden. I would also like to introduce a little colour if possible. My garden is very exposed and is on quite a windy site. I look forward to your reply.

Marian Burgess

Hello there, There are many plants that might tempt you - here are some of my favourites:- Fatsia japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/fatsia-japonica/classid.3840/ Rodgersia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rodgersia/cat.plants/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/cat.plants/ Hydrangea paniculata http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hydrangea-paniculata/ Aucuba japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/aucuba-japonica/classid.277/ Rosa rugosa Alba http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/roses/shrub-rose/hedging/bush-rose/hedging-rose/other-shrub-rose/rosa-rugosa-alba/classid.1148/ Cotoneaster http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cotoneaster/ Buddleja http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.buddleja/ I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Can I use Rootgrow on established Roses? Can Rootgrow be usefully used on established roses? If not, please could you advise me as to what I should use on them at this time of year, to help next year's flowering? Sarah

Sarah Craig

Hello Sarah, Rootgrow should only really be used when you are first planting as it needs to come into contact with the roots. At this time of the year the best thing you can do for established roses is apply a generous layer of composted organic matter as a mulch. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Sarah Craig

Thankyou for your suggestion that I apply composted organic matter to my roses. I will do this. Sarah

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