Pennisetum × advena 'Rubrum'

fountain grass ( syn setaceum 'Rubrum' )

5 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (3 reviews) Write review
9cm pot £8.99
within 4 weeks
3 × 9cm pots £26.97 £24.00
within 4 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Pennisetum × advena 'Rubrum' fountain grass ( syn setaceum 'Rubrum' ): Fabulous red-purple foliage

This grass dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: light, moderately fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (will need winter protection)

    Deep red to burgundy foliage with small, bristly red-purple flower spikes from July to September. This gorgeous ornamental grass looks great planted in a large clump where the flower spikes swaying in the breeze are a real eye catcher. For best results plant in a sunny spot in light moderately fertile, well-drained soil and shelter from extreme winter cold. Its highly recommended that this plant is bought in to a frost free place in winter.

  • Garden care: To halt the spread of the plant remove any unwanted self-sown seedlings as part of routine spring border maintenance. Deciduous in colder areas, it will need protection from winter cold and wet.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

Elegant complimenting wide variety of planting situations

5

Growing in a pot to assist with winter storage as not hardy. Still in dormant state in March so unable to say yet whether it has survived the winter. Hope so as only available to buy in Autumn and my last one didn't survive so I only had the benefit of it for a short while during the growing season.

EcoGardener

West Yorkshire

true

Healthy Plant

5

Plant arrived in a healthy condition and is dormant at the moment. As this was bought later in the season I am yet to see its full potential.

JeanP

North Lanarkshire

true

All good.

5

Spotted this grass walking past a garden and had to get one. Nice and different, especially if you like dark foliage. The small plant you get was 5 times its original size and had lots of flowers by the end of the summer, (having put it in a large pot). It's not hardy so I didn't risk putting it in the ground and its been stored in a greenhouse over winter. Fingers crossed it will come back to life in spring.

Phill

OxfordShire

true

2000014535

5.0 3

100.0

I have one of these in a container. Would a garage be OK to overwinter it or would this be too dark? The garage does have a couple of windows.

Bobbi

Hello there No I think it will be too dark. I would move it to a frost free greenhouse, or keep it outside in a sheltered spot against the side of the house, wrapped in frost fleece.

hi will this grass survive in a large planter?

gardening kate

Hello, Yes, this plant tends to thrive in a pot, provided it is kept well fed and watered.

Helen

How do you insulate this outside? I don't have a greenhouse to store it in over winter

redkez

Hello, You could give it a really generous mulch around the rootball in milder areas, or cover it with a fleece cloche in colder regions. In all areas, it is important to make sure it does not get too wet in winter, so avoid planting in heavier soils. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/fleece-protection-jacket/classid.2000018343/

Helen

I pruned this fountain grass rubrum right back to 5-10 cm sticks autumn-wiinter last year as advised by supplerr. No sign of new growth at all yet. Not sure if this was the correct advice. Will it come back? Thanks

grassgranny

Hello, yes, these plants tend to lose their leaves in colder areas in winter, so they can be cut back, however they are not fully hardy, so can succumb to winter wet and cold. A better option would have been to keep the top growth to help insulate it and then cut it back in spring. Having said that, these are not one of the first grasses into growth, so I would give it another month and you may see some new growth.

Helen

Late ornamental grasses

Late-season grasses come into their own from September adding another element or two - movement and texture to your garden. Most are tall and graceful and most move and sway with a gossamer presence. As autumn continues the texture of the awns, be it soft

Read full article