Malus × moerlandsii 'Profusion Improved'

crab apple (syn. 'Directeur Moerlands')

5 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (3 reviews) Write review
20% off all fruit
10 lt pot (1.5-1.8m) £79.99 £63.99
available to order from winter
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Malus × moerlandsii 'Profusion Improved' crab apple (syn. 'Directeur Moerlands'): Deep pink flowers and purple leaves

This plant is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Dusky, dark, purple-pink flowers smother the branches in late spring and are followed by cherry-like, reddish-purple edible fruit. The bronze-purple leaves mature to dark green with crimson veins. This vigorous, spreading, purple-leaved crab apple is best in full sun. Pollution tolerant, it makes a gorgeous tree for a sunny, urban site.

  • Garden care: When planting incorporate lots of well-rotted garden compost in the planting hole and stake firmly. Remove dead, diseased and crossing branches while the tree is dormant.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
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more info

Eventual height & spread

Happily established, already showing promise .

5

Feature tree . Good contrast with back ground hedges Spring and autumn interest.

Marsdenmill s glos

Bristol

true

Beautiful tree

5

Received tree in perfect condition two weeks ago. We planted it immediately in prepared site. It has already started to grow. Really pretty tree which will provide some welcome colour in a previously drab corner.

Mogsa

Stockton on tees

true

Super!

5

Have to be honest, I was a bit hesitant ordering a tree online, after all could I be confident it would look good, be undamaged etc? A super tree arrived, in tip top condition, well grown with good spacing of branches and no damage in sight what so ever. Very very pleased, planted up and looks really great as a feature tree in my front garden.

Martina

Suffolk

true

4592

5.0 3

100.0

How close can I plant this to my front wall? When the tree gets bigger can I remove lower branches if they are causing any obstruction? Is this the narrowest tree I can get (4m spread?)

Amy

Hello, This is the most compact crab apple that we currently sell, however you will be able to remove some of the lower branches as it grows to help raise the crown. As for how far away from the base of a wall you can plant it, you need to keep in mind that the rootball will be roughly the same size as the crown in size.

Helen

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