Lysimachia atropurpurea 'Beaujolais'

3 × 9cm pots £20.97 £16.99
in stock (shipped within 3-5 working days)
9cm pot £6.99
in stock (shipped within 3-5 working days)
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Buy Lysimachia atropurpurea 'Beaujolais' loosestrife: Long-lasting, burgundy flowers and silver leaves

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy


    Striking, burgundy flower spikes on long slender stems flower continuously from May to September. The attractive, crinkled rosettes of silver-green foliage are an excellent foil for the flowers, which are also highly attractive to butterflies. A versatile plant that can be short-lived, spreads slowly and performs best in a moist border in sun or partial shade, or it can be grown in a pot on the patio. It makes an excellent cut flower, too.


  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of organic matter when planting. Do not allow to dry out. Apply a generous 5-7cm mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plants in spring and lift and divide congested colonies.

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Eventual height & spread

Eventual height and spread

Notes on Lysimachia atropurpurea 'Beaujolais'

"The rosette of crinkled grey-green leaves marked with pale veins produces a spike of burgundy-red flowers on this biennial loosestrife"

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All died

1

Bought two border sets last year which included these plants. Every single one died. All other plants of the border set have come back and are growing/flowering well.

Julian

Dorset

false

A bit hit and miss

4

Initially I ordered three Lysimachia atropurpurea Beaujolais plants and planted them in a position which received sun for most of the day, and is well draining but has some shade early in the morning/late in the afternoon for short periods. Here the three plants grew slowly but seemed to do well. They came into flower and I loved them. Looked just like the photos on the website/when googled. So I bought 6 additional plants for my front garden. While I waited for these additional plants to arrive, one of the first three fell over and then died completely. I wrote it off to probably due to some insect gnawing at the stem/root system and killing the plant (we are in a very rural, invertebrate rich location). The 6 additional plants arrived, and were in better shape (a bit larger and 'bushier') than the first 3 had been upon their arrival. I planted the 6 in the front garden and they are currently thriving! Growing much faster and blooming more quickly than the first three planted in the back garden. Meanwhile, the remaining 2 in the back garden are dying, instead of thriving like the front ones. I followed planting instructions with all plants, and watered them well on very hot days/when it seemed like they needed it. It was a very cold spring this year and everything has been struggling a bit, so I'm giving the benefit of the doubt but had this not been the case, I would have given these plants 3 stars due to whether or not they thrive being quite unreliable/the plants being far more sensitive to environmental variation than is stated in the description, or if this is not the case, specimens arriving in varying states of condition dependent on order timings, which results in some thriving and some dying. I've included a photo of the 6 plants that are doing well and two photos of the ones that seem to be suffering from drought (browning of leaves) even though where they are planted is normal, well draining soil and if needed I water).

Wils

West Midlands

true

An unusual plant with long lasting blooms.

5

Beautiful spires of rich colour stand out in the border

Gardening Granny

Glasgow

true

Jury's out

3

Was really pleased with these at first - flowered for a long time - but they do tend to spread in a bit of strange, gnarled way, & look very dead (rather than asleep) now in December. Plan to move them & see how they do next summer. Lovely colour though.

Susannah

Herefordshire

Attractive plant

4

I tried this plant from seed some years ago but they were rather lax. The Lysimachia I bought from Crocus were sturdy and grew well this summer. The stems of flowers have a graceful arching habit. I look forward to their regrowth next year.

Herbaceous Helen

New Barnet

true

My absolute Garden favourite

5

I purchased 3 last Autumn and they have flowered for months. Deadhead and you get more flower. Love them!

Keen and lean

Wilts

true

Super plant for bee garden

5

These plants were a big hit with the bees in my garden and were super hardy, flowering all through the very hot summer of 2018. They are very beautiful, about a metre tall waving gently in the breeze - add a lovely dimension to the garden. Highly recommend these, they will be a staple in my garden : )

Emerald

Chelmsford

true

I would buy this product again.

4

A strange plant with an almost alien like form. Striking and different, long flowering. I had to stake young plants last summer, but it was extremely hot.

Lucinda

Cambridgeshire

true

Lysimachia Beaujolais

5

I have a large garden and need to fill a lot of areas that get weedy. I look for small low growing plants to set off larger perennials and shrubs.

Eileen

Brewood

true

Beautiful but took over the bed

3

So pretty but grew huge and heavy, struggled to keep it lifted

Sam

Bristol

true

2000010778

4.1 15

92.9

What is this plants estimated lifespan assuming optimal conditions please? I have had many losses of this plant over the past few years, moat recently in an area of fairly damp greensand soil heavily conditioned with compost (at least 4 inches worth). Should it be treated as an annual? All my plants grow well in the first year but don't make it though to the second i.e. don't survive the winter. Should i treat it as an annual?

shastonlad

Hello, These are not particularly long lived and many people treat them as biennials, replacing them every 2 to 3 years.

Helen

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