Kniphofia uvaria

9cm pot £7.99
Available in 3 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Kniphofia uvaria red hot poker: Scarlet buds and bright orange, torch-like flowers

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August and September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Tall bright and imposing, kniphofias lend height, vibrancy and drama to any garden. This variety produces tall spikes of red flower buds that open to orange and fade to yellow above clumps of semi-evergreen, strap-like leaves. Originally from South Africa, the fiery, torch-like flowers of this kniphofia make vertical accents in a sunny border and work particularly well in a planting scheme based on 'hot' colours. They also look great against a background of ornamental grasses. This is an easy and undemanding plant.

  • Garden care: In autumn remove and compost the faded flower spikes and apply a deep dry mulch such as pine needles around the crown of the plant. Cut back to the ground in spring to keep the foliage fresh-looking. Divide and re-plant overcrowded colonies in spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Unusual but striking

5

It was a relatively small plant when it arrived and I wasn't sure how big it was supposed to be. It didn't flower at all the 1st year but it seemed to grow at an alarming rate without much attention or care (I maybe fed it once or twice)..Then in the 2nd year it has bloomed and wow it is stunning

MissMuni

West Yorkshire

true

Good condition.

5

An attractive plant for the herbaceous borders not readily available in garden centres.

Avtextiles

Cheshire

2000027803

5.0 2

100.0

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