Campanula persicifolia var. alba

peach-leaved bellflower

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2 litre pot £9.99
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Buy Campanula persicifolia var. alba peach-leaved bellflower: Tall spikes of bell-like white flowers

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

    • Position: full sun or partial shade
    • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained, neutral to alkaline soil
    • Rate of growth: average
    • Flowering period: June and July
    • Hardiness: fully hardy

      A classic of the cottage garden, this tall bellflower produces large, white cup-shaped flowers on slender stems in June and July among toothed, bright green leaves, which it retains all year. It's an ideal plant for the back of a mixed or herbaceous border, especially in partial shade. It's earlier flowering than many other varieties, and provides excellent cut-flowers, too.

    • Garden care: Protect the tender foliage from slugs and deadhead regularly. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted compost around the base of the plant in spring. Stake with bamboo canes or brushwood in spring before the flowers appear. Deadhead to prolong flowering

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Just stunning

5

This is one of my favourite Campanulas, the flowers are so white they seem to glow. Every one who sees it say they love it, ask me the name and totter off to purchase for themselves. It is so easy to grow, hardly any maintenance needed and it really gives a great display, flowering profusely. I highly recommend this plant, it is a joy to have in the garden.

Carrots

Staffordshire

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Campanula persicifoliavar.alba

5.0 1

100.0

My campanula has not produced any flower yet! Though there is a good clump of healthy leaf, can you help me?

berberis

Hello there There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade or not enough water or nutrients. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why yours has not produced flowers, but given time and the right conditions, there is no reason why it won't flower. You can often give them a bit of a push by feeding during the growing season with a high potash fertiliser. Hope this helps

Plants for outside my front door Hi Crocus I live in a flat and have pots outside my external front door. What plants can I grow in pots, in semi shade that will attract the bees? Thank you for your help. Kind regards Guy

Guy Smith

Hello Guy, The following plants would be suitable for your pots. Forget-me-not (Myosotis species) Bellflowers (Campanula species) Cranesbill (Geranium species) Dahlia - single-flowered species and cultivars Hellebores (Helleborus species) Japanese anemone (Anemone ?? hybrida) Fritillaries (Fritillaria species) Grape hyacinth (Muscari species) Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) Box (Buxus sempervirens) Christmas box (Sarcococca species) I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

The Chelsea Chop (and other methods of extending the flowering season)

Many gardeners who are happy, even gung-ho, with the secateurs when pruning shrubs and climbers are surprisingly reluctant to take the shears to herbaceous perennials. Maybe this is because it just doesn't seem quite right to be cutting back all that new

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