Abelia × grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope' (PBR)

2 litre pot £14.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Abelia × grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope' (PBR) abelia: A colourful low-grower

This shrub is semi-evergreen, so it can lose some of its leaves in winter. In colder regions or more exposed gardens, it may lose them all, but then fresh new foliage appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to October
  • Hardiness: borderline hardy (may need protection in winter)

    As the name suggests, 'Kaleidoscope' is promarily grown for its colourful foliage, which starts off in spring as a mix of bright yellow and green. During the summer the colour intensifies and deepens, and then in autumn shades of orange and red creep in. To top it off, it produces small pink-tinted white flowers, which emerge from pink buds, over a long period in summer and autumn. A low-growing, semi-evergreen shrub, it will help beef things up in the shrub border.

  • Garden care: Deadhead regularly to prolong flowering. In autumn after flowering, lightly trim back the flowered shoots to retaina neat and tidy shape. Remove any dead or damaged wood in April.

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Eventual height & spread

Good, attractive plant

4

Love Abelia 'Kaleidoscope' and use it a lot in gardens. It's colourful without being garish and has added bonus of late flowers which the bees love. Low growing and easy to prune if it throws up the odd long shoot. It is generally evergreen but some lost their leave in last year's harsh winter. They did regenerate but took a little time. Prefers full sun.

Gpee

Sussex

true

Abelia Kaleidoscope

5

Arrived in excellent condition. Thriving well in the garden and surviving the snow and frost. This multi coloured bush contrasts well with the surrounding greens

cb

East Yorkshire

true

Abeliaxgrandiflora'Kaleidoscope'

4.5 2

100.0

The Abelia kaleidoscope I planted last year has gone quite straggly and leggy, with a lot of bare stems under the superficial leaf cover. Unfortunately I didn't prune it after flowering...Is it too late to prune it now? There won't be much foliage left if I do!

Carolyn

would this make a good low maintenance hedge . Aspect east facing light shade sheltered by buildings and if so how close together should I plant them...I'm torn between this and euonymus fortune I thankyou

Garden cat

It would make an interesting informal hedge, however it will need a sunny spot to thrive.

Helen

Early-flowering summer shrubs

Many of the earlier-flowering summer shrubs make good partners for shrub roses. They tend to be in the same colour range: sometimes flowering just before and sometimes with the main flush, but often fragrantly. Abelia, Deutzias and Kolkwitzias fall into t

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