100 × 65 × 40cm £76.99
in stock (shipped within 2-4 working days)
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Wooden coldframe: The solid timber construction and twin-wall polycarbonate glazing surrounds a generously sized growing area, that can be used to protect your more tender plants from the worst winter weather. It also makes a great space to grow your seedlings, so they can get off to a flying start early in the season.<br><br>The hinged lid has locking stays, which means they can be left ajar on warmer days and then shut again when the temperatures drop.<br><br>Supplied as an easy to assemble flat pack.<br><br>Measurements:<br>L100cm x W65cm x H40cm (at the back)

The solid timber construction and twin-wall polycarbonate glazing surrounds a generously sized growing area, that can be used to protect your more tender plants from the worst winter weather. It also makes a great space to grow your seedlings, so they can get off to a flying start early in the season.

The hinged lid has locking stays, which means they can be left ajar on warmer days and then shut again when the temperatures drop.

Supplied as an easy to assemble flat pack.

Measurements:
L100cm x W65cm x H40cm (at the back)

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Good specification

5

Bought as a present so no direct experience but reports very good.

Fred

Edinburgh

true

A highly portable cold frame.

4

The cold frame is very lightweight, which is both a pro and a con. It's easy to move around, but needs weighting down with bricks or similar to prevent it being moved by strong winds. Rather expensive for what it is.

SM

West Midlands

false

Well-built but rather lightweight

3

The double-layer plastic 'glass' is good, but for the money I was hoping for a cold frame with a heavier and stronger timber frame. Time will tell as it appears to be hardwood which should last longer than cheap softwood. This item is now one year old and is looking OK so far. It did its job admirably last spring.

Mintcake Grower

Kendal

true

2000013474

4.0 3

66.7

Acanthus spinosus Good Morning to you, I was wondering if you could give me some advice on how to take cuttings/root division of my Acanthus spinosus. I have a well established plant, and I'm hoping to move within the next year and wanted to take it with me, how would I go about this or taking a root division I look forward to hearing from you Gaynor

Gaynor Killick

Hello There, These plants can be propagated by either division in spring or autumn or take root cuttings in winter. Division is probably the fastest and easiest. It is best carried out on frost free, dry days when the plant is dormant, normally between late autumn and early spring. Simply lift the parent plant and shake off the excess soil. Separate the plant into sections using two forks or a spade, making sure that each section has a good root system and replant immediately keeping the soil level the same as before. Root cuttings are generally done in winter when the plants are completely dormant. You should select healthy, young roots, preferably at least 5mm in diameter that have been taken close to the crown of the plant. Trim the roots to 5-10cm for the thicker pieces and 7-12cm for the thinner ones, making a straight cut on the end which has come from the near the crown and a slated cut at the furthest end. Remove any fibrous roots and dust with a fungicidal powder. Pop them vertically into pots of compost, with the straight cut end flush with the surface of the compost. The thinner roots you can lay flat in trays and cover with a little compost. They should then have a topdressing of grit or sand. Keep them in a cold frame or propagator and don't water them until they have formed roots. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

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