Lathyrus odoratus 'Cupani'

sweet pea seed Cupani's original

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approx 20 seeds £2.99 £2.39
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Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Lathyrus odoratus 'Cupani' sweet pea seed Cupani's original: One of the most powerfully scented sweet peas

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: hardy perennial

    This sweet pea was first introduced to the UK in 1699 when a Sicilian monk, Francis Cupani, sent seeds of this highly fragrant annual to Dr Robert Uvedale, a teacher from Enfield, Middlesex. Thanks to its delicious scent the sweet pea has gained popularity throughout the centuries and over 400 years later the range of colours has increased enormously. Many of the modern varieties however lack the scent of their older relatives, which is why we have included this old variety in our collection. The flowers may be a little smaller than their recently introduced cousins, but they have a brilliant two-tone colour and the scent is to die for. You simply wont find a sweet pea with a better scent than this one.

  • Garden care:From October to late February, sow seeds into deep pots or root trainers filled with a good-quality seed compost and place them in a cold frame. Pinch out the tips as the plants grow to encourage them to become bushier and produce more flowers, and harden off before planting out in early April. Direct sowings can also be made in October or March-April. It is important to remove the faded flowers before they set seed, so picking them to fill a vase inside will only encourage more to form.

  • Sow: October-April

  • Flowering: June-September

  • Approximate quantity: 20 seeds.

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more info

Eventual height & spread

I'd buy again

4

Great colours and scent , cropped for a long time but only about 2 flowers per stem but lots of them

Sue

Scotland

Yes

Lathyrus odoratus'Cupani'

4.0 1

100.0

What does 'pinching out' mean? I would like to buy some Sweet Peas however, I'm not sure what the term 'pinching out the tips' means. Any clues on how you would do this?

Ms Sau Min Chang

Pinching out, simply means removing the growing tip of the plant. This encourages the plants to produce lateral shoots, which will result in bushier growth. All you need to do is nip out the top two leaves and growing point of each plant using your fingers or a small pair of scissors.

Crocus

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