Kniphofia 'Tawny King'

Kniphofia 'Tawny King'

9cm pot £7.99
in stock
3 × 9cm pots £23.97 £21.00
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><br><li><b>Position:</b> full sun or partial shade<li><b>Soil:</b> fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> average<li><b> Flowering period:</b> July to October <li><b>Hardiness:</b> fully hardy<br><br>Tall bright and imposing, kniphofias lend height, vibrancy and drama to any garden. 'Tawny King' produces fantastic 'pokers' with dark bronze stems and tubular, cream flowers that open progressively from the base of the flowerhead above clumps of evergreen, strap-like leaves. The flowers start opening in July from apricot buds and continue to flower well into October. Originally from South Africa, the elegant, torch-like flowers of kniphofia make vertical accents in a sunny border and look particularly good as an exotic scheme based on 'hot' colours. They also look great with a background of ornamental grasses. This is an easy and undemanding plant.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> In autumn remove and compost the faded flower spikes and apply a deep dry mulch such as pine needles around the crown of the plant. Cut back to the ground in spring to keep the foliage fresh-looking. Divide and re-plant overcrowded colonies in spring.<br><br>


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to October
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Tall bright and imposing, kniphofias lend height, vibrancy and drama to any garden. 'Tawny King' produces fantastic 'pokers' with dark bronze stems and tubular, cream flowers that open progressively from the base of the flowerhead above clumps of evergreen, strap-like leaves. The flowers start opening in July from apricot buds and continue to flower well into October. Originally from South Africa, the elegant, torch-like flowers of kniphofia make vertical accents in a sunny border and look particularly good as an exotic scheme based on 'hot' colours. They also look great with a background of ornamental grasses. This is an easy and undemanding plant.

  • Garden care: In autumn remove and compost the faded flower spikes and apply a deep dry mulch such as pine needles around the crown of the plant. Cut back to the ground in spring to keep the foliage fresh-looking. Divide and re-plant overcrowded colonies in spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Exquisite colours

5

I put mine in a good sized pot and put in a sunny position. It must have liked it as it has thrived and is big enough to be divided into several plants.

Connie

Devon

Yes

Great plant for the border

4

Dramatic contrast amongst a selection of ornamental grasses. Long lasting flowering period.

Mandy

Hampshire

Yes

Didn't flower

1

The plants looked healthy but nothing happened during the flowering season.

kc

cheshire

No

Bright jump out red

5

Deep bright red, pops of vibrant colour Worth the wait! Plant in groups Takes 2 years to get going Early flowering

Mink

London

Yes

2000020428

3.8 4

75.0

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