Lavandula angustifolia 'Imperial Gem'

9cm pot £6.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
3 × 9cm pots £20.97 £18.00
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Lavandula angustifolia 'Imperial Gem' lavender: An excellent variety for low hedges

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A compact, bushy variety of English Lavender which is covered with masses of tightly packed, rich purple flowers in summer. These contrast beautifully with the silver-grey foliage. Because of its neat, compact form, this is an excellent variety to create low hedges in cottage or formal gardens. The flowers are loved by bees, and they are good for cutting and drying.

  • Garden care: Cut back the stalks after the flowers have faded. Carefully trim back in April, taking care not to cut into old wood

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more info

Eventual height & spread

Quick growing and nicely scented

5

i've got lots of these plants around my garden and, apart from dark shade they thrive. They grow quickly, have attractive foliage and flowers that last for ages, especially if you clip off those that have gone over. The only time I've killed one was over-zealous pruning too early in Spring.

Bluebell

Midlothian, Scoltand

true

Excellent service

5

Wonderfully packaged!

Trisha

Pinhoe Exeter

true

Lavender hedging

5

I bought the lavender for an awkward space in my garden, and it looks great, it's hardy and if you follow the instructions on pruning, it'll last well

Carys

Worcester

true

Lavandula angustifolia'Imperial Gem'

5.0 3

100.0

Hi. I am wanting to plant a couple of lines of lavender either side of a path. Can I plant the 9cm ones now? Will they survive the winter? Or should I wait and plant larger pots in early summer?

jolidoc

Hello, These ones are fully hardy so can be planted out now, while other lavenders (mainly the French types) are more tender and should be planted out in spring. As they are quite young plants however do make sure they dont get trampled or eaten.

Helen

Which Lavenderis best for border edging and what size plants? Hi I am at the moment pulling out some very shabby Lavender which was edging two borders. I would like to replace them but I am not sure which would be the best variety to use (I inherited them with the house and can't tell what they were). I would also appreciate some advice on how far apart to plant them and whether it would be better to buy the bigger more mature plants or samller plants? Thanks in advance for any guidance you can give me. Katie

Katie Waddington

Hello Katie, All Lavenders do well as hedging, but as the angustifolias are hardier, I would opt for this type. If you want a taller hedge and you don't mind being a little patient, then I would opt for the smaller pots of Lavandula angustifolia. If however you want a more compact hedge, then L. angustifolia Munstead or L. angustifolia Hidcote would be a better option. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which Lavender will grow in a pot? I would be so grateful if you could help me. I am trying to buy an 82 year old lady some sweet smelling lavender for a birthday present. she only has a balcony, so it would have to live in a pot. Do you have anything suitable?

Ruth Inglefield

We do sell some lovely lavenders on our site and they all do well in pots provided they are kept well watered. The best are probably the more compact forms such as the following (you can click on the links below the names to go straight to them) Hidcote http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/lavenders/lavandula-angustifolia-hidcote/classid.2000010501/ Imperial Gem http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/lavandula-angustifolia-imperial-gem/classid.2000008657/ Munstead http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/lavenders/lavandula-angustifolia-munstead/classid.2000002724/

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