Angelica gigas

9cm pot £6.99
in stock
3 × 9cm pots £20.97 £18.00
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Angelica gigas angelica: Tall, dramatic burgundy flowers

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full or partial shade
  • Soil: deep, moist, fertile, loamy soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August and September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy (but short-lived)

    This angelica is a stunning, architectural plant that will add height and drama to a border. It produces dome-shaped heads of plum-purple flowers on red-tinted stems in August and September and it has pretty, deeply cut leaves. Try it at the back of a sunny, herbaceous or mixed border, where the flowerheads will attract bees. It performs best in moist, fertile soil. This plant is usually short-lived and will die back after setting seed.

  • Garden care: To prevent the plant from self-seeding, deadhead after flowering. Even if you leave the seedheads, it tends not to self seed as freely as other angelicas, so needs to be replaced regularly.

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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Angelica gigas

"The domed, beetroot-red heads and thick stems of this branching biennial angelica can dominate a summer border - but they need a sunny position and a pale backdrop to show off those dark architectural stems"

Great plants- fantastic germination

5

These grew well and were easy maintenance once i was aware they are a slug magnet when small. Excellent plants

garden dabbler

Bristol

true

Angelica

5

the plant was very healthy when it arrived, however due to the unusually dry summer I lost my plant,

DMF

Holmfirth, West Yorkshire

true

Three of Crocus's plants make a high impact in a big border!

5

These plants give a very visible and interesting display, which makes them useful in generously filling empty spots in late summer - I like to keep them in deep pots so I can maximise height and move around among other tall plants

Oxford gardener

Oxford

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Beautiful

5

A beauty. However, I have had to start growing it in a huge pot on the sunny terrace because something in my garden, and not the slugs, is quite partial to it. I have a really big planter I used for an olive tree that died and I grow it with verbena bonariensis and pennisetum purpureum. I am not too keen on the modern designer garden looks as I prefer the cottage and wildlife garden madness but this combo works very well in my pot against a white wall especially in the evening when a solar light glow.

SL

London

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Well pleased !

5

Slow to start but a great finish.

Ginbin

Pontypridd

true

Bees Bees Bees

4

Not to be honest a beautiful plant, but unusual, before they burst from their sack the flower head looks similar to a small aubergine, and I almost felt the need to peel away the layers to free it, but when free its a Bee fest, such activity its a joy to think you are doing this

About,Alfie

Bournemouth

Beautiful plants

4

These are great back of border plants, beautiful colour, and are a magnet for bees and hoverflies. This year I've bought 3 in the Autumn rather than spring, so we'll see how they fare. I'm still trying to grow them from the seeds they produce each year, but no success yet. Worth every penny though,even so.

Sally

Herts

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2000010576

4.7 7

100.0

hi Crocus I'm not sure this is a question about quality! more general advice.I bought 6 angelica gigans last autumn and for the first time ever they've done nothing - I've bought them every year since I first discovered them. They are, just now in September starting to grow - they are a few inches high with new leaves!! What should I do? Might they grow next spring if I leave them where they are? I'm guessing this is partly due to the hot weather, although they did get regularly watered. I also wondered whether this could be anything to do with buying in Autumn rather than Spring - would it have been better if I'd waited? I've never bought in Autumn before so wondered if that might be relevant. I always grow them in the same place so it's not that. many thanks

Sally

I am not really sure why your plants did not grow this year, however if they are just now starting to grow, then it is likely that these will go on to flourish next year.

Helen

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