Pieris 'Flaming Silver'

Pieris 'Flaming Silver'

2 litre pot £14.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><li><b>Position:</b> full sun or partial shade<li><b>Soil:</b> humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost<li><b>Rate of growth: </b> slow-growing<li><b>Flowering period: </b> April and May<li><b>Hardiness: </b> fully hardy<br><br>A pretty, small, variegated, evergreen shrub with bright red, young leaves which develop silvery-white edges, contrasting beautifully with the older leaves. In mid and late spring, clusters of pretty, white, nodding bell-like flowers, resembling lily-of-the-valley appear. This compact shrub looks wonderful in a shady shrub border with well-drained, acid soil or in a container in a patio or courtyard garden.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b > Add composted pine needles or peat when planting. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of composted pine needles or peat each year around the base of the plant in early spring. Remove the faded flower heads in late spring along with any frost-damaged foliage.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Flowering period: April and May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A pretty, small, variegated, evergreen shrub with bright red, young leaves which develop silvery-white edges, contrasting beautifully with the older leaves. In mid and late spring, clusters of pretty, white, nodding bell-like flowers, resembling lily-of-the-valley appear. This compact shrub looks wonderful in a shady shrub border with well-drained, acid soil or in a container in a patio or courtyard garden.

  • Garden care: Add composted pine needles or peat when planting. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of composted pine needles or peat each year around the base of the plant in early spring. Remove the faded flower heads in late spring along with any frost-damaged foliage.

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  • Next / named day £6.99
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CrocusPieris'Flaming Silver'
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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5.0

Great healthy plant

By Bunty

from Birmingham

About Me Avid Gardener

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Accurate Instructions
  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Patio

    Comments about Crocus Pieris'Flaming Silver':

    Great healthy plant delivered. Crocus delivery is exceptional.

    Lilly of valley flowers forming on plant. Can't wait for the spring to see the red leaves I love about this plant.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Keen but clueless
    • Primary use:
    • Personal

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    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    3 Questions | 3 Answers
    Displaying questions 1-3
    • Q:

      How do I prune this plant and how do I plant new leaves come from the base of the plant in to new pots
      Asked on 31/5/2013 by Manchester

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Hello,

        These plants require little pruning apart from dead-heading and removing frost damaged stems, If however you want to encourage bushier growth, you can give it a light trim each year after flowering.

        As for producing a new plant from low-growing stems, you can 'layer' these as follows. Mark to point where the stem touches the ground with a short bamboo cane. Dig a sloping trench from the shrub to the cane, so the deepest point (approx 8cm) is near the cane. Make a 2.5cm long slanting cut along the base of the plants stem where it touches the ground and using a soft brush, dust the cut with hormone rooting powder. Using stout wire pins, peg the stem into the base of the trench and bending the tip of the stem, tie it onto the cane. Back-fill the hole with fresh compost and water well. Once the stem has developd roots, it can be severed from the parent plant and potted up.

        Answered on 3/6/2013 by Helen from Crocus
    • Q:

      My Pieris "Flaming Silver" is not flaming, lots of flowers/silvery leafs but no red this year. Is there something that I can feed with to bring back the colour. The plant is about eight years old and growing well.
      Asked on 7/4/2013 by greenthumbs from Limerick (southern Ireland)

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Hello,

        I have never heard of this before, but the foliage does not usually appear until a little later, so I wonder if the new foliage has not emerged just yet - particularly as it has been so cold. Applying a generous layer of mulch (ericaceous compost would be ideal) around the root ball will certainly not do any harm, as will feeding with a Rhododendron fertiliser - please click on the following link to go straight to a good one.

        http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-rhododendron-azalea-and-heather-feed/classid.1000000178/

        Answered on 8/4/2013 by Helen from Crocus
    • Q:

      Pieris struggling and 'Lily of the Valley' dying back-why?

      Good Afternoon, I recently bought some 'Lily of the Valley' (Convallaria majalis) from Crocus and 3 x hardy annuals and 1 x evergreen bush which were a gift for a friend. They were planted 1 day after deleivery but now the leaves are turning yellow and brown, and the plants have started drooping. Any advice on what could be causing this would be very helpful - I wouldn't have been so worried if it was just the small annual, - but the evergreen shouldn't be doing this. Thank you for any help with this matter,
      Asked on 31/8/2009 by Teresa Farr

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello There, The Convallarias will be dying back naturally at this time of the year, so I would not be concerned about them. As for the Pieris, these like acidic conditions, so I suspect that it may not be planted in the right soil. The best thing to do would be to pot it up immediately into a really large pot fill with ericaceous compost if your friends soil is not acidic. I hope this helps Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 1/9/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
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