Echinops ritro 'Veitch's Blue'

2 litre pot £11.99
within 4 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Echinops ritro 'Veitch's Blue' globe thistle: Good for repeat flowering

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: poor, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Ever popular for their globes of blue flowers that attract hoards of insects, globe thistles bring a natural look to the garden. This handsome blue variety is ideal for the middle or back of a sunny, well-drained border. It makes a particularly good cut or dried flower.

  • Garden care: Cut down to the ground after flowering to encourage a second flush of flowers. Lift and divide congested colonies in autumn or spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Echinops ritro 'Veitch's Blue'

"Ideal as a focal point in a gravel or Mediterranean garden; attracts hordes of bees and butterflies; appeals equally to dried flower arrangers"

long lasting and benefits Bees!

5

The insects especially bees absolutely loved this flowering shrub. Always amazes me that the spiky feel of the flowering head of the thistle presents no problems to the bees etc. Very pleased I purchased these items and satisfying to know that the flowering heads are proving beneficial to insect wildlife. Quality plant delivery.

Jan

Dunstable Bedfordshire

true

Bees love it

5

Happy in our average soil, in a sunny spot. Am using it as the central tall element in an open patch of border. Seems to get bigger and better every year, so not to worry if it looks a bit small at first.

Lynne

Leeds

true

Good

4

Good grower

EP1

Scotland

Good plant for a dry border

4

I have planted this in a sunny border backed by a hawthorn hedge. It can be a bit straggly, but I use a metal plant support. It flowers well, and is a good companion for Stipa giganntea, and penstemon ' Garnet'. It has coped well with the dry conditions this year. No added watering required.

Enthusiastic gardener

North Nottinghamshire

true

Waiting to see

5

Planted end of last summer- the plants have over-wintered well and are beginning to sprout new growth - hopefully they will look lovely later in the year when they flower

Max

March Cambridgeshire

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Spectacular blue globes beloved by bees

5

A big globe thistle really good for late summer colour, very much an easy care plant good for the back of the border or as a specimen plant. Seeds freely so keep on top of seedlings unless you want a mass of them. Grows almost anywhere on almost any soil, best in a reasonable amount of Sun although it will tolerate partial shade, tens to lean towards light in very shady places

Country Girl

Warwickshire

true

Echinops ritro'Veitch's Blue'

4.7 6

100.0

I bought these from you in April this year , they are growing well and look healthy but haven,t flowered at all this year , do you know why not? Many thanks

Nett1

There are several reasons why this may happen, but the most likely ones are usually not enough sun, or the plant focusing on root growth rather than flowers.

Helen

When can I move my Echinops safely? Hi I want to transplant an Echinops which is being swamped by a large shrub. The Echinops is at present about 18 ins high. Is it likely to survive if I do it now in April? I'm afraid it may not "do" much this summer otherwise as it will be completely in the shade? I would be grateful for your advice. Thank you Sue

Sue Heggs

Thank you! I think I'll try and curb my desire to shift it immediately! Sue

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello Sue, Ideally these should be lifted from autumn to spring while they are still dormant, so it will be tricky doing it now. My advice would be that if the plant looks healthy enough, then leave it where it is this summer and move it in autumn. If however it looks like it is really struggling, then take the risk and do it now. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Sue Heggs

What can we grow in our dry, sunny border? I have a sunny and very dry border up against the front of the house. It is about 14 inches wide but protected by the house from receiving hardly any rain. Because of the window any plants must be less than 1m high. We have considered lavender but would really appreciate any other suggestions.

Carl and Deirdre Leaman

There are some lovely plants (including the lavenders) that will thrive in a dry, sunny spot, but it will be important that they are kept really well watered for the first year or so until they have had a chance to become established. Below are some of the ones we sell, just click on the link below each plant name to find out more about that particular one. Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Cistus&x=5&y=8 Santolina chamaecyparissus Nana http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4359&CategoryID= Lavender http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Lavandula&x=10&y=9 Achillea http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Achillea&x=11&y=7 Echinops http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=echinops+ritro

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