Achillea millefolium 'Red Velvet'

6 × 9cm pots £35.94 £23.96
within 2 weeks
9cm pot £5.99
within 2 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Achillea millefolium 'Red Velvet' yarrow: Deep red, flat heads of flowers and feathery foliage

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moist, well-drained, non acidic
  • Rate of Growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This cultivar is said to have a good resistance to colour fade, so the flattened, plush velvet red flowerheads, which are held on upright stems above the aromatic fern-like foliage, hold their colour well throughout summer. Best in full sun in the middle rank of the border. Achilleas will attract many beneficial insects including bees, butterflies and hoverflies to the garden.

  • Garden care: Protect from slugs. Stake using twiggy stems before the flowers appear. Cut back after first flowering to encouragesecondary flush in late summer/early autumn. Old clumps can be revived by lifting, splitting and replanting in spring.

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Eventual height & spread

A reliable and versatile purchase.

5

Starting a new garden (at a new build) so wanted something reliable yet decorative. It worked out perfectly, is still healthy looking and I have been able to divide it up for greater colour this year.

Brian

Southern Scotland

true

Deep pink! Not red.

4

The flowers are not red as the image posted on the website; more like deep pink. The plants are healthy and quite vigorous, spreading a bit too fast for my liking.

Marsa

Lancashire

true

Pretty with grasses

4

Arrived as a small plant with just one flower which quickly withered. However this was at the end of the Summer and now , following a particularly long,cold and snowy winter there are already green shoots so all appears well

Soozles

Penistone

true

I would definitely recommend these plants

5

These were excellent quality plants from Crocus. I already have some Achillea 'Red Velvet ' and have been delighted to see that planted under a SW facing garage wall they have been evergreen all winter, through snow and freezing temperatures. The red flowers persisted for several months last summer, eventually fading to pink. A first class Achillea as long as it has full sun and a free draining soil.

Fiona

East Hampshire

true

Disappointing

2

Good initial colour but changes too quickly/better in prairie style design than beds/excellent colour for bold clashing schemes

Moorland lass

Exmoor

false

Beautiful rich colour

5

Great for cottage garden mid-border.

Maggie

Winchester

true

Lovely plant though the colour fades more quickly than hoped

4

Lovely deep red colour, but it fades more quickly than I'd hoped and doesn't look as "good in death" as I'd hoped. Haven't had the plant a full year yet.

Esther Wolff

Harrogate

true

Lovely colour

5

This filled a space in the border and continued to flower through to November.The colour is really vibrant without being a harsh red. Excellent sturdy plant.

butterkist

wirral

true

2000013959

4.3 8

87.5

I have large sycamores will yarrow growbeneath them if not,then what?

Evelyn

Hello, Achilleas prefer a sunny spot, so would not be ideal for this spot, however there are lots of plants that will thrive in the dry, shady conditions under a large tree (provided they are kept well fed and watered - please click on the following link to go straight to them. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/vid.241/

Helen

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can we grow in our dry, sunny border? I have a sunny and very dry border up against the front of the house. It is about 14 inches wide but protected by the house from receiving hardly any rain. Because of the window any plants must be less than 1m high. We have considered lavender but would really appreciate any other suggestions.

Carl and Deirdre Leaman

There are some lovely plants (including the lavenders) that will thrive in a dry, sunny spot, but it will be important that they are kept really well watered for the first year or so until they have had a chance to become established. Below are some of the ones we sell, just click on the link below each plant name to find out more about that particular one. Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Cistus&x=5&y=8 Santolina chamaecyparissus Nana http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4359&CategoryID= Lavender http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Lavandula&x=10&y=9 Achillea http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Achillea&x=11&y=7 Echinops http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=echinops+ritro

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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