Foeniculum vulgare 'Giant Bronze'

fennel - bronze

9cm pot
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£5.99 Buy
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Smoke-bronzed swirls of aniseed-scented leaves topped with fragile umbels of dainty yellow flower provide a garden aromatherapy treatment - a sensation with red crocosmias

Val Bourne - Garden Writer


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Fine clouds of feathery, bronze-purple leaves are followed by flat-topped, sulphur-yellow flowerheads in mid to late summer and then by aromatic seeds. This giant fennel looks fantastic as a centrepiece for a sunny herb garden, or among tall perennials and grasses. The foliage acts as a delicate veil through which the flower heads of herbaceous plants and bulbs can be seen.

  • Garden care: The plant's tendency to self-seed may be a problem in hot summers. If fennel is being grown exclusively for its foliage, remove the yellow flowerheads to prevent it from self-seeding. When flowers have finished them cut back to 30cm from the ground.

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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusFoeniculum vulgare 'Giant Bronze'
 
4.3

(based on 3 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

No Pros

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Garden (3)

Reviewed by 3 customers

Displaying reviews 1-3

Back to top

 
5.0

Show stopper

By Branielfran

from North west england

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Beautiful Bronze Fronds
  • Excellent At Back Of Bord
  • Great Show Plant
  • Hardy
  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Outdoors
    • Patio

    Comments about Foeniculum vulgare 'Giant Bronze':

    Grows very tall 4ft. So best as a backdrop for other smaller plants. Looks quite exotic and unusual. Very hardy.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced
     
    5.0

    lovely foilage

    By Jude

    from Glos

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Attractive

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Garden

      Comments about Foeniculum vulgare 'Giant Bronze':

      lovely foliage in late summer

       
      3.0

      Remove seedheads

      By Rozzer

      from Hampshire

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Accurate Instructions
      • Attractive
      • Hardy
      • Healthy
      • Versatile

      Cons

      • Difficult To Use

      Best Uses

      • Garden
      • Outdoors
      • Patio

      Comments about Foeniculum vulgare 'Giant Bronze':

      An attractive plant in a gravel garden or in prairie type planting. I left the seedheads on as they are attractive over winter and are a source of food for birds. However these produce scores of seedlings the following season and these rapidly produce deep taproots making them difficult to weed out. I suggest seedheads are removed.

      • Your Gardening Experience:
      • Experienced

      Displaying reviews 1-3

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      Do you want to ask a question about this?

      If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
      2 Questions | 2 Answers
      Displaying questions 1-2
      • Q:

        2006 Planting Chelsea Flower Show enquiry

        Hi, I see you have plants available for the current show, but do you have a plant list for the 2006 award winner (Daily Telegraph,Tom Stuart Smith) available as I am interested in buying some of these plants? Thank you for your time, Kelly
        Asked on 5/4/2010 by kelly mackenzie

        1 answer

        • A:

          Hello Kelly, He did use a lot of plants in his garden - here is a list which includes most. Allium Purple Sensation Anthriscus Ravens Wing Aquilegia Ruby Port Astrantia Claret Carex testacea Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum Dahlia Dark Desire Euphorbia Fireglow Geranium Lily Lovell Geranium phaeum Samobor Geranium Phillipe Valpelle Geranium psilostemmon Geum Princess Juliana Gillenia trifoliata Hakonechloa macra Iris Dusky Challenger Iris Dutch Chocolate Iris Sultan's Palace Iris Superstition Iris Supreme Sultan Knautia macedonica Lavandula angustifolia Nepeta subsessilis Washfield Nepeta Walkers low Purple fennel - Giant Bronze Rodgersia pinnata Superba Rodgersia podophylla Salvia Mainacht Sedum matrona Stachys byzantina Stipa arundinacea (syn.Anemanthele lessoniana) Stipa gigantea Tulip Abu Hassan Tulip Ballerina Tulip Queen of Night Verbascum Helen Johnston I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

          Answered on 6/4/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
      • Q:

        When should I plant bronze fennel?

        I would like to plant some fennel in a sunny part of my garden. I see from your website it will be available to buy within the next two weeks. Is this the right time to plant it or should I wait until spring?
        Asked on 9/11/2004 by Edwina Dufton

        1 answer

        • A:

          As this plant is fully hardy you can plant it at any time throughout the year as long as the ground isn't frozen or waterlogged. Autumn is a good time to plant as the soil temperatures are still quite warm. This means that the roots have a chance to settle in and spread a little before the worst of the weather hits, and that means bigger and better growth next spring. Keep in mind though that at this time of the year it will be cut right back, but it will start to grow again in spring.

          Answered on 9/11/2004 by Crocus
      Displaying questions 1-2

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