Phyllostachys nigra

black bamboo

5 litre pot 60-70cm
pot size guide
£39.99 £29.99 Buy
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10 litre pot (1m)
pot size guide
£44.99 £34.99 Email me when in stock

The only black bamboo, restrained in habit, with damson-purple bloomed stems accentuated by narrow white rings and pale bud scales appearing at regular intervals

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast growing
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    One of the most elegant bamboos, with polished, damson-black mature canes and dark green leaves. The slender, arching canes, which are dark green for the first two or three years, look perfect in a contemporary, minimalist garden particularly if the low-growing foliage is stripped. Although this is not one of the more vigorous and invasive bamboos, it is advisable to restrict the roots using a rigid, non-perishable barrier to prevent the plant from colonising adjacent plantings.

  • Garden care: Plant in a large container or surround the roots with a non-perishable barrier that restricts the plant's spread. Water regularly until established. Bamboos do not like competition, so are best planted en masse in a designated area of the garden.


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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusPhyllostachys nigra
 
5.0

(based on 2 reviews)

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  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

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    (0)

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Reviewed by 2 customers

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(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

this was a present

By suppy 88

from northampton

Pros

  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy
  • Moves Beautiful In Wind
  • Stays In A Clump
  • Versatile

Cons

  • Hard Work To Devide

Best Uses

  • As A Screen
  • Garden
  • Lawn
  • Outdoors
  • Patio
  • Pool Area

Comments about Crocus Phyllostachys nigra:

birds love this hiding amongst the canes, before heading for the feeding station.
great round a pond,
good for a wind break,

  • Your Gardening Experience:
  • Experienced

Comment on this review

(10 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Good looking and reliable

By TopGuns

from London

Pros

  • Hardy
  • Healthy
  • Versatile

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden

    Comments about Crocus Phyllostachys nigra:

    I have this bamboo on the patio in a large pale blue pot and the combination is stunning. I use it as a screen against the fence and it does the job really well. I feed once a year and water when required. Great plant, highly recommended

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced

    Comment on this review

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    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    38 Questions | 47 Answers
    Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
    • Q:

      What is the best barrier to use in the ground to stop this bamboo spreading wildly? How deep does it need to go?
      Asked on 6/21/2014 by beeb from Twickenham

      1 answer

    • Q:

      Hi there,
      Is it possible to restrict the height of the bamboo by pruning?
      Asked on 4/27/2014 by Messydigger from Cambridge

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Hello,

        It is possible to restrict the plants height by pruning. I would be careful not to cut it back too hard, but keeping it at around 2.5 - 3m should be fine.

        Answered on 4/30/2014 by helen from crocus
    • Q:

      Phyllostachys nigra

      Hi there, I would like to buy the black bamboo to put in a big container on my balcony, which is on the 6th floor and is very open and quite windy, with no cover over the top. Do you think this could survive, with the winds. Its a south facing balcony in south west London. Thank you.
      Asked on 11/4/2013 by windybalcony from london

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Hello,

        If the balcony has some shelter, then the Phyllostachys nigra should be fine, provided it is kept really well watered. If however the balcony is very exposed and windy, then a better option would be Pseudosassa japonica - please click on the following link to go straight to it.

        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/pseudosasa-japonica/classid.1620/

        Answered on 11/6/2013 by Helen from Crocus
    • Q:

      I am thinking of planting Phillostachys nigra. I have an area 3m x 3m which is surrounded by concrete paving. Will the roots go under the paving or will it be contained without the need for extra containment
      Asked on 7/3/2013 by Mike from Derby

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Morning
        I would still recommend restricting the roots, even though this is not one of the more vigorous and invasive bamboos with a rigid, non-perishable barrier.
        Hope this helps

        Answered on 7/3/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
    • Q:

      My next door neighbour has just replaced an attractive hedge between our properties with a rather ugly fence which I want to screen using Phyllostachys nigra. The fence is 4.7m long. Approximately how many bamboo plants will I need to use to screen a fence of this size? Does one 5 litre pot contain 1 plant?
      Asked on 6/18/2013 by wannabegardener from Weybridge

      1 answer

      • Plant Doctor

        A:

        Hello there
        Yes there is one plant per pot, which will be approx 60-70cm tall.
        Phyllostachys nigra is classed as clump-forming, so it is not one of the more vigorous and invasive bamboos, but I would still recommend restricting the roots, using a rigid, non-perishable barrier, and the plants will need to be managed if you don't want them spreading out into the garden.
        If you are trying to create a hedge effect, I would recommend planting them at 50cm intervals.
        I hope this helps.

        Answered on 6/19/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
    • Q:

      Can I grow a Bamboo in a pot?

      Dear Sir Please can you tell me if I can grow a bamboo in a 2ft deep window type box for a patio? Thanks Roger
      Asked on 4/15/2010 by roger pannell

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello Roger, As long as you make sure you keep it really well fed and watered, it should be fine as long as it is nice and wide. After a couple of years though it will need to be planted in the ground - as will most things that grow to a good size. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 4/16/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Bamboo planting advice required

      Please help! I bought 2 bamboos from you in October in 2009 .I now plan to plant them in the final position in the garden.What I need is advice on the size of container I should plant them in to restrict the growth.I have the Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis and Phyllostachys Nigra. Best regards
      Asked on 4/10/2010 by Anonymous

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello There, The Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis has an eventual spread of 6m, while the Phyllostachys nigra is more restrained and will only grow to 3m. Ideally then you will need to largest pot you can find if you want to restrict their growth. A giant plastic dustbin with lots of holes punched into the bottom may be suitable, but you will need to lift and replace it every few years as it will slowly disintegrate. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 4/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Can I plant my Bamboo in the ground in a pot with drainage holes?

      I have a couple of largish bamboos that I wish to plant in a pot in the ground. However, the plastic pots have drainage holes in the bottom. I know that bamboo can become extremely invasive (which is why I wish to plant them in pots). Will the roots go through the holes in the bottom? Or should I use pots without drainage holes? If so, will the bamboo survive with no drainage? Or is there a special type of pot for this purpose? Many thanks. Anne
      Asked on 4/6/2010 by Anne Lear

      3 answers

      • A:

        Hello again Anne, The Phyllostachys nigra is classified as non-invasive (or clump-forming), but even so it has an eventual spread of 3m. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 4/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
      • A:

        Can certain types of bamboo be non-invasive? I have, apparently, a black bamboo. Many thanks Anne

        Answered on 4/12/2010 by Anne Lear
      • A:

        Hello Anne, The bamboos will not survive without drainage holes in the bottom of the pots, so this is essential. Sadly though even a tough plastic will deteriorate over time and may crack and split, so they will certainly help, but in the very long term the plants may break out. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 4/12/2010 by Anne Lear
    • Q:

      Info on Succisa and Phyllostachys nigra

      Hi I am about to put in another order but I have a couple of questions first please: - 1. Succisa pratensis 'Peddar's Pink' - roughly, how big are the actual flowers please? 2. Phyllostachys nigra -I want to plant this next to my house. Is it okay to do this or should I only be considering it for a spot further away from the house? I am wondering whether the roots could be a problem (I see it gets very tall). Many thanks
      Asked on 4/5/2010 by Kali Oliver

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello There, The Succisa flowers are roughly 2 -2.5cm in diameter and are very pretty. As for the bamboo, this variety has an eventual spread of 3m and they do spread by underground rhizomes so I would be careful about planting it too close to the house. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 4/6/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Advice on Bamboo and Liriope

      Hi, I have a typically small back yard at my London Victorian terrace house. I have my heart set on bamboo and would like your advice on the best variety to buy. The width of the area I am looking to plant is just over 4 metres. I don't want it to spread and I don't want it to intrude too much in terms of depth and bushiness as it's a small garden. The one I'm looking at from your website is... Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis - showy yellow-grove bamboo. Is this the right sort of thing? Or any other suggestions? How many plants would I need to buy to fit in the 4m width? Thanks Regards, Gabrielle
      Asked on 3/12/2010 by Gabrielle Kilpatrick

      3 answers

      • A:

        Hello Gabrielle, The Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis is a spreading bamboo and has an eventual spread of 6m, so it is not ideal. A better option would be either Fargesia murieliae http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/ or Phyllostachys nigra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/phyllostachys-nigra-/classid.1601/ Both of these are clump-forming, however even these will need to be dug up or 'managed' if you want them not to spread, as even the smallest one will get 1.5m cross. If you are trying to create a hedge effect, then I would recommend planting them at 50cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 3/15/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
      • A:

        Hello, Many thanks for this advice. I think I will go with the Phyllostachys nigra. Now for another question........ I have 2 garden beds - both are 5 metres long and 50cm deep. One has a width of 30cm and is mostly shade. The other has a width of 15cm and has partial sun. Do you think Liriope would go well in both of these? How far apart do you space Liriope? Regards, Gabrielle

        Answered on 3/21/2010 by Gabrielle Kilpatrick
      • A:

        Hello again Gabrielle, Liriope will grow just about anywhere so they will be a good choice - although they will need more water in the sunnier position. As for spacing, I would plant them at around 20cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 3/22/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
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