Geranium 'Orion'

cranesbill

9cm pot
pot size guide
£5.99 Buy
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2 + 1 FREE 9cm pots
pot size guide
£17.97 £11.98 Buy
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1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A bigger geranium, which is covered with clear violet-blue flowers, with red veining and a white centre, throughout the summer. Its spreading habit makes it ideal for quick growing, summer groundcover.

  • Garden care: In midsummer rejuvenate plants that are beginning to look jaded, by removing old flowered stems and leaves. Lift and divide large colonies in spring.

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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusGeranium 'Orion'
 
5.0

(based on 4 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Attractive (4)
  • Hardy (4)
  • Healthy (4)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Garden (4)

Reviewed by 4 customers

Displaying reviews 1-4

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5.0

long flowering

By liz

from Appleby North Lincs

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Outdoors

    Comments about Geranium 'Orion':

    Arrived in healthy condition. Prolific flowering over a long period. Nice bushy habit.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Keen but clueless
     
    5.0

    Great ground cover

    By Octo8

    from West Sussex

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Accurate Instructions
    • Attractive
    • Hardy
    • Healthy

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Garden
      • Outdoors
      • Patio

      Comments about Geranium 'Orion':

      The tiny plants that arrived soon established themselves, offering great ground cover and stunning blue/purple flowers.

      • Your Gardening Experience:
      • Real novice
       
      5.0

      Great addition to my border

      By Motherbunch

      from Liverpool

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Attractive
      • Hardy
      • Healthy

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Garden

        Comments about Geranium 'Orion':

        A great staple for a garden border. The colour of the "Orion" is a vivid shade which is true to the illustration. Planted in the Spring it flowered in its first year. It has already started to spread which is what I want but do bear this in mind if you have a small garden. Saying that, it is easy to control. A beautiful, hardy plant that never disappoints. I would recommend it.

        • Your Gardening Experience:
        • Keen but clueless
         
        5.0

        Excellent Plant

        By Fortfield

        from London

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Attractive
        • Hardy
        • Healthy
        • Versatile

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Garden

          Comments about Geranium 'Orion':

          I think this is one of the all time great Gernaniums with a really beautiful deep blue flower. It is long flowering May to October and will take full sun but does not do as well in deep shade. It may need a little care to get started like all perennials( just do not let it dry out in its first year) but once it is established it is fabulous. Use it to fill in gaps in the front of your border.

          • Your Gardening Experience:
          • Experienced

          Displaying reviews 1-4

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          Do you want to ask a question about this?

          If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
          4 Questions | 5 Answers
          Displaying questions 1-4
          • Q:

            Hi - can I plant geranium Orion in a pot? If so, how many 9cm small pots would I buy to put in a big pot? Would it be good to mix them with something else in the same pot - it's for a terrace area.

            Many thanks
            Asked on 2/5/2014 by Crazy daisy from Islington, London

            1 answer

            • Plant Doctor

              A:

              Hello there
              Yes you can plant this geranium in a pot, and will be good on it's own. It is a fast grower with a spreading habit which normally flowers between June to August. But this is a perennial and although it does have a long flowering period, it won't flower as long as say a bedding geranium.
              How many p9 pots you need depends on the size of your container, but bear in mind that these are fast growing and it can grow to 80cm wide eventually.
              Hope this helps.

              Answered on 6/5/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
          • Q:

            Plant advice for 2 new beds please

            Hello, I need some help to decide which plants to put into two new areas please:- 1: A semi-circle flash bed at the front of the house, size approx 2m x 0.80m and 0.80m deep. I thought about the 3 following options for a small tree/bush in the middle:- a) Magnolia soulangeana, but I was worried about the size that it could grow to and possible problems with roots etc . Will it stay small if the size of the container is used to restrict it? b) Witch Hazel (Hamamelis intermediana 'Diane'). Will it spread too much? I think this is very pretty. c) Corylus avellana 'contorta' Then I also need to think about ground cover plants to help suppress weeds. I am only interested in fully hardy, easy to look after plants, could be with some flowers or coloured leaves. 2:- A thin path between neighbours (approx 2m x 0.40). My idea is to plant bamboo. I would love a modern thin run of bamboo with ground cover. My worry is which bamboos to use. I love the yellow, like Phyllostychys aureocaulis (Golden Grove) but not sure if it is strong enough as it could be exposed to some wind. I bought from you a couple of years ago the Phyllostychys aureosulcata 'Spectabilis' which I planted in pots but it died this year. I see on your website some other bamboos but I don't like them as much as their canes seems less exposed and have a lot more foliage. But possibly these would be a better alternative... ...? For the ground cover I as thinking of Ophiopogen nigrescen. Do you think these plants will be suitable, or have you any other suggestions? Thank you for your help, Galia
            Asked on 15/2/2010 by e moran

            1 answer

          • Q:

            Is it still ok to be cutting back herbaceous perennials, Lavender and Caryopteris late in the year?

            Dear Crocus, I didn't have time to cut back to ground level all my herbaceous perennial plants and some shrubs in the autumn, due to work and family commitments. It's difficult to get out into the garden just now as I only have a little time at the weekend. Would it be too late for me to cut everything back still between now in December and the end of February e.g hardy Geraniums, Hostas,etc. and shrubs like Lavenders and Caryopteris? I really would appreciate your advice. Many thanks Pamela
            Asked on 13/12/2009 by Pamela Spiers

            2 answers

            • A:

              Hi Helen, Thank you for your helpful information. The snow made the decision for me, it has lain for 4 weeks now. Kind Regards Pamela

              Answered on 9/1/2010 by Pamela Spiers
            • A:

              Hello Pamela, You can do the herbaceous perennials anytime between now and spring, but the Caryopteris and Lavenders should be tackled in spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

              Answered on 15/12/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
          • Q:

            Plants for outside my front door

            Hi Crocus I live in a flat and have pots outside my external front door. What plants can I grow in pots, in semi shade that will attract the bees? Thank you for your help. Kind regards Guy
            Asked on 29/7/2009 by Guy Smith

            1 answer

            • A:

              Hello Guy, The following plants would be suitable for your pots. Forget-me-not (Myosotis species) Bellflowers (Campanula species) Cranesbill (Geranium species) Dahlia - single-flowered species and cultivars Hellebores (Helleborus species) Japanese anemone (Anemone ?? hybrida) Fritillaries (Fritillaria species) Grape hyacinth (Muscari species) Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) Box (Buxus sempervirens) Christmas box (Sarcococca species) I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

              Answered on 30/7/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
          Displaying questions 1-4

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