Garrya elliptica 'James Roof'

silk-tassel bush

2 litre pot 20cm
pot size guide
£19.99 Buy
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Offers great architectural interest for the back of the border where its long flower tassels look elegant, especially when covered in frost

Lucy Summers - Greenfingers Guides


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moderately-fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: December to February
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection in cold areas)

    Long, silvery catkins up to 20cm long, shine out among glossy, wavy-edged, dark green leaves throughout winter. The silken tassels of this upright, evergreen shrub make a stunning feature in the winter garden. Try it towards the back of a sunny, shrub border, against a wall or as a windbreak in coastal areas. When it has finished its display, the dark foliage makes a lovely foil for summer-flowering shrubs.

  • Garden care: Cut back dead or straggly branches in April or May.

Cistus × purpureus

rock rose

Large, bright pink flowers

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Lonicera × purpusii 'Winter Beauty'

winter honeysuckle

Fantastic fragrance during the winter

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Philadelphus 'Belle Etoile'

mock orange

A compact, highly fragrant mock orange

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Cistus × purpureus 'Alan Fradd'

rock rose

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Escallonia 'Apple Blossom'

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Myrtus communis

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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusGarrya elliptica 'James Roof'
 
4.5

(based on 4 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Healthy (4)
  • Accurate instructions (3)
  • Attractive (3)
  • Hardy (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Garden (3)

Reviewed by 4 customers

Displaying reviews 1-4

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4.0

Second time lucky

By Julie-Anne

from Loñdon

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden

    Comments about Garrya elliptica 'James Roof':

    I bought one 2 years ago which died over winter despite following the instructions. This one has overwintered very well putting on much new growth. I'm excitedly awaiting the first catkins!

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced
     
    5.0

    Excellent service

    By Peterj

    from London

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Accurate Instructions
    • Attractive
    • Hardy
    • Healthy

    Cons

      Best Uses

        Comments about Garrya elliptica 'James Roof':

        I would not usually use an on-line supplier to purchase plants but Crocus have proved reliable in terms of quality, packaging and plant quality on each and every occasion

        • Your Gardening Experience:
        • Experienced
         
        5.0

        I recommend this plant

        By Bart

        from Holmfirth

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Accurate Instructions
        • Attractive
        • Hardy
        • Healthy

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Garden
          • Outdoors

          Comments about Garrya elliptica 'James Roof':

          An attractive plant and a good companion to others.This plant has settled into its planting position well and will be a very good addition to our plantings

          • Your Gardening Experience:
          • Experienced
           
          4.0

          So far so Good

          By myosotis

          from Hertford UK

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Accurate Instructions
          • Attractive
          • Hardy
          • Healthy

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Garden

            Comments about Garrya elliptica 'James Roof':

            It is still very young but has a mass of as yet (December) unopened catkins. It i still only about a metre tall so does not dominate

            • Your Gardening Experience:
            • Experienced

            Displaying reviews 1-4

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            Do you want to ask a question about this?

            If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
            17 Questions | 19 Answers
            Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
            • Q:

              I have a Garrya planted approx 1 ft from my boundary and it has been there 20 years or so and is approx 3m high but my neighbor is going to build an extension on his side of the boundary and I'm worried about the roots getting damaged. Do the roots spread widely and if they do will the plant die off if they are damaged?
              Asked on 10/10/2016 by WilfMcGrew from London

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello there
                Unfortunately it is hard to say how far the roots will have spread, as roots will naturally go towards available water and don't spread evenly. Whether the plant will die, this it really depends on how much of the root system is damaged.

                Answered on 12/10/2016 by Anonymous from crocus
            • Q:

              hi could i grow this in a large pot in a coastal south facing garden up the front wall of a garage? does it need support to climb or is it self attaching?
              Asked on 9/4/2016 by Vicky from United Kingdom

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello,

                These plants are not suited to very exposed coastal gardens, however if you are set back a little, or have a very sheltered garden, then you may get away with it. Ideally however (as they get pretty big), they should be planted out into the ground where their roots can spread out and grow. Finally, these are shrubby plants, so if you want them to grow flat against a wall, their stems will need to be tied onto support of some kind.

                Answered on 11/4/2016 by Helen from crocus
            • Q:

              I am trying to find a nice plant to cover a wall by my front door. One that can be neatly grown around a gas meter box. Either planted in a pot or in the ground. The ground is heavy clay and it is west facing covering a wall area of 3.5 meters by 2.5 meters approx.
              Any suggestions? I was thinking of putting a large trough or plant some plants into pots around it.
              Asked on 19/10/2015 by Val from Farnham

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello there
                A Garrya would be lovely grown against a wall. It will tolerate a clay soil and likes a west facing aspect, but if possible I would grow it in the ground as this is quite a large shrub.
                Hope this helps.

                Answered on 21/10/2015 by Anonymous from crocus
            • Q:

              If I let Garrya Elliptica grow to 4m, against a fence, (for privacy) will it look unkempt or straggly? Does it need to be pruned, or is it ok without it?
              Also, when the tassels fade, do they turn brown and remain on the bush for a long time, or do they drop off after they have faded?
              Also, do the catkins drop off whole, or do they crumble? I am wondering how much of a mess it makes when they fall off.
              Thank you.
              Asked on 23/6/2015 by br from london

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello,

                These make very handsome wall shrubs, particularly if they are given a little formative pruning. For best results cut way any outward facing stems when you plant it, leaving just one or two stems that will create a permanent framework. These remaining stems can then be tied onto a support - ie. trellis panel or wires.

                Then as the plant grows, you can pinch out the growing tips of any outward-facing shoots as this will encourage side branching, or remove badly placed branches to their base in early spring. Lanky lateral growth can be trimmed back, again to encourage bushy new growth, which can be tied onto the support as it grows.

                As for the catkins, they do turn brown as they mature and do remain on the plant until they become almost crispy. At that point they can either crumble entirely, or fall off in one piece.

                Answered on 25/6/2015 by Helen from crocus
            • Q:

              I have a garrya elliptica which has never produced tassels in the five years I have had it growing on a north facing wall. I have never pruned it and it is growing quite well but is straggly. Will it ever produce tassels?
              Asked on 8/3/2015 by Chris from Essex on Suffolk, Cambridge border

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello there
                Given the right conditions it should produce tassels, you could always try and give it a push by feeding through the growing season with a high potash feed.
                You can give it a light trim to remove any dead and straggly branches in April or May.
                Hope this helps.

                Answered on 10/3/2015 by Anonymous from crocus
            • Q:

              Can I grow garrya elliptica in a pot?
              Asked on 8/1/2014 by Beck from Norwich

              1 answer

              • Plant Doctor

                A:

                Hello there
                You could try growing it in a really large pot, but it would need to be well watered and fed. Ideally it is better to grow it in the ground, as this large shrub could grow to 4m x 4m eventually.
                Hope this helps

                Answered on 13/1/2014 by Anonymous from Crocus
            • Q:

              Winter flowering shrubs and climbers to plant with new hedge

              Hello, I have newly planted a hedge (made up from Hornbeam, Rosa rugosa, Blackthorn, Cornus, Hawthorn and Hazel) about 50ft long. I have been told that if I was to plant amongst the hedge some winter flowering Clematis such as 'Wisley Cream' it would give some nice colour these bleak winter months when the hedge is bare of foliage. The hedge is south facing and although the ground is ???good??? heavy Cambridgeshire clay the hedge has been planted in a trench back filled with leaf mulch, chipped wood and spent peat. Although I have said about in-planting Clematis in the hedge, I am open to other plant suggestions if you have any. Regards Terry
              Asked on 31/12/2009 by Terry Allum

              1 answer

            • Q:

              Clay loving evergreen plant for covering a wall

              Sir, I need to hide an ugly brick wall. I would prefer to have all year cover, meaning evergreen, and not over 6` or so tall, and able to thrive in my clay rich soil. I thought of a blue lilac but am not sure if the roots could cope. A variety of plants might look nice and would breakup the monotony of the wall, but your advice would be much appreciated. Sincerely, Dorothy.
              Asked on 17/12/2009 by dorothy

              1 answer

            • Q:

              Plant to cover a fence

              Please can you suggest a shrub/tree that could be grown as an espalier on a new 2 metre close boarded fence, facing East by North-it gets a good few hours of sun in the morning. I need to cover about 10 to 12 feet in width, and the plant would need to be planted close to one end of the fence. (The fence borders a paved area leading into a border.) I would hope to start with something already fairly well grown if possible. Many thanks
              Asked on 6/12/2009 by Rita Ireland

              2 answers

              • A:

                Hello There, The best options would be one of the following
                Chaenomeles http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.chaenomeles/
                Pyracantha http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.pyracantha/
                or Garrya http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/garrya-elliptica-james-roof/classid.3880 Unfortunately though we only sell the sizes listed on our site and none of them will have been trained into an espalier. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

                Answered on 8/12/2009 by Rita Ireland
              • A:

                Dear Helen, Thank you for the reply. I had been thinking about Pyracantha so you have confirmed that this would be suitable.

                Answered on 8/12/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
            • Q:

              Garrya elliptica

              Hi all, Could you please tell me if your Garrya plants are male or female, or do you have both? Regards, Nigel.
              Asked on 2/10/2009 by Nigel Percy

              1 answer

              • A:

                Hello Nigel, The Garryas we sell are not sexed, so they could be either a male or a female plant. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

                Answered on 2/10/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
            Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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