Convallaria majalis

lily-of-the-valley

9cm pot
pot size guide
£4.99 Buy
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3 × 9cm pots
pot size guide
£12.00 Buy
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Spend £60 and save £10

Plant in terracotta pots and surround the clean dainty white heads of bells and the encircling broad-green leaves with moss - or let it wander in shade

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: partial or full shade
  • Soil: leafy, fertile, humus-rich, moist soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Ever popular, lily-of-the-valley is an excellent groundcover plant for moist, humus-rich areas of the garden, quickly spreading to form a fragrant carpet of pure white, bell-shaped flowers and long, dark green leaves. The plant flourishes in sun or partial shade, and the diminutive, bell-like flowers are traditionally an important part of spring wedding bouquets. The seeds may cause a mild stomach upset if ingested.

  • Garden care: Divide and replant congested colonies in September, applying a generous mulch of composted leaf mould around the base of the plant.


  • CAUTION toxic if eaten

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Hosta 'Francee' (fortunei)

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3 Questions | 4 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    Hi - is this (July), a good time to plant lily of the valley? A certain TV gardener says plant in leaf, in Spring for best chance of flowers. But I wonder if giving them a chance to find their feet for several months might give them a better chance? I have a full shade spot for them - so not too hot. What do you think?
    Asked on 7/3/2013 by Charlotte from South East Kent

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Morning
      We sell lily of the valley in 9cm pots which can be planted at any time of the year as long as they are kept well watered as they don't like to dry out. They like a leafy, fertile, humus-rich, moist soil, and a topdress in the autumn with a mulch of composted leaf mould around the base of the plant.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 7/3/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    Growing plants for a wedding

    Dear Crocus, I am a very happy customer ..... I love your site, plants and service. I learnt about you first from Arabella Lennox-Boyd. But now I am writing for some advice please. My sister is getting married in Oxfordshire on the last weekend of May. I would love to grow the flowers for the wedding. I have a big garden with empty beds and a green house at my disposal. Could you give me some advice on types of cut flowers that would be in bloom at the end of May? Some pointers as a place to start my research and buying would be fantastic. Thank you very much, Best wishes, Kate
    Asked on 1/8/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom

    2 answers

    • A:

      Thank you so much Helen - amazing! I'll send you photos of the finished results. Best wishes and thanks again, Kate

      Answered on 1/8/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Kate, It will be a little hit and miss as a lot will depend on the weather, but the following plants should be in flower around that time. Choisya ternata
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/choisya-ternata-/classid.825/
      Osmanthus x burkwoodii
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/osmanthus-%C3%97-burkwoodii-/classid.4171/
      Syringa http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.syringa/
      Viburnum x carlcephalum
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/viburnum-%C3%97-carlcephalum-/classid.4460/
      Convallaria majalis
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.convallaria/ Iris
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.iris/ Paeonia
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.paeonia/ Euphorbia palustris
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/euphorbia-palustris-/classid.2794/
      Aquilegia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aquilegia/
      Ceanothus Skylark
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/ceanothus-thyrsiflorus-skylark/classid.728/
      and if we have a hot start to the summer a couple of roses or some of the earlier lavenders may have started too. I hope this gives you lots of ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/8/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom
  • Q:

    Pieris struggling and 'Lily of the Valley' dying back-why?

    Good Afternoon, I recently bought some 'Lily of the Valley' (Convallaria majalis) from Crocus and 3 x hardy annuals and 1 x evergreen bush which were a gift for a friend. They were planted 1 day after deleivery but now the leaves are turning yellow and brown, and the plants have started drooping. Any advice on what could be causing this would be very helpful - I wouldn't have been so worried if it was just the small annual, - but the evergreen shouldn't be doing this. Thank you for any help with this matter,
    Asked on 8/31/2009 by Teresa Farr

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, The Convallarias will be dying back naturally at this time of the year, so I would not be concerned about them. As for the Pieris, these like acidic conditions, so I suspect that it may not be planted in the right soil. The best thing to do would be to pot it up immediately into a really large pot fill with ericaceous compost if your friends soil is not acidic. I hope this helps Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 9/1/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-3

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