broccoli 'Purple Sprouting'

broccoli - late purple broccoli

10% off Selected Vegetable Seeds
approx 750 seeds £0.99 £0.89 Buy
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All seeds delivered for £1

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well drained, moisture-retentive and firm

    A tall, stately brassica that's easy to grow and hardy enough to withstand the worst of winter, yet produces one of the most delicious winter crops of all. Attractive deep purple sprouts, a little like calabrese, are produced in abundance from early spring, with a delicate flavour and crunchy texture that's perfect lightly steamed or in stir-fries. Sow both early- and late-maturing varieties of purple-sprouting broccoli to extend the harvest over two months or more.

  • Growing Instructions:Sow seeds in a shallow drill in a prepared seedbed in early summer, thinning seedlings to 7-10cm apart and transplanting onto the vegetable plot once they reach 10cm tall. Space plants about 60cm apart and firm in well. You can also sow into free-draining seed compost in pots or seed trays. Protect from slugs and net against pigeons.

  • Sow: May-June

  • Harvest: April-May

  • Approximate quantity: 750 seeds.

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