Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia'

false acacia

10lt pot (1.2-1.5m) £49.99 £42.99 Buy
+
-

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May and June
  • Flower colour: white
  • Other features: autumn colour
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Glorious, almost fluorescent-yellow foliage turning yellow-green in summer, then orange-yellow in autumn and clusters of fragrant, white flowers in late-spring and early summer. This vigorous, broadly columnar tree makes an excellent specimen for a sunny, suburban garden. Shelter from strong winds and avoid disturbing the roots, since the tree is prone to suckering.

  • Garden care: On trees trained as a central-leader standard any competing leaders should be removed as soon as possible in mid- to late-summer. On established trees pruning is best kept to a minimum as large pruning cuts don't heal well. Remove suckers early on.

    • Harmful if eaten

Geranium phaeum

dusky cranesbill

Small, deep maroon flowers. Good for groundcover

£7.99 Buy

Clematis 'Black Prince'

clematis (group 3)

Beautiful deep purple flowers

£12.99 Buy

Acer platanoides 'Crimson King'

Norway maple

A large handsome tree with attractive foliage

£49.99 Buy

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

smoke bush

Magnificent smoke-like plumes

£44.99 Buy
 

Do you want to ask a question about this?

If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
5 Questions | 5 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    Is it possible to keep the robinia as a small tree about 4-5 m?
    Regards,
    Liz Tong
    Asked on 3/28/2013 by ET from Southampton

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      These trees can tolerate a little light pruning, but hard pruning should be avoided. Therefore I would not recommend trying to keep them cut back too hard.

      Answered on 4/2/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Robinia pseudacacia 'Frisia' - thorns?

    Hi I would like to purchase a Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia' but have noticed that some varieties have thorns on the branches. Can you tell me whether the variety you sell has thorns? Many thanks Emma
    Asked on 2/16/2010 by Emma Slack

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Emma, These may or may not have thorns, but as it is the nature of the plant to be variable we cannot guarantee if ours will develop thorns or not. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 2/16/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Large Yellow Leaved and Deciduous Tree please...

    Dear Team, My large magnificent Robinia pseudoacacia has died and I read in the Hilliers newsletter that I am not alone. I need to fill the gap with something substantial, impressive and yellow, but I am advised, naturally, not to repeat with another Robinia pseudoacacia for fear of the same disease. I am impressed with your Catalpa big. 'Aurea'. Before I finalise the decision however, have you any other suggestions, please? Regards, Geoffrey
    Asked on 9/28/2009 by Anonymous

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Geoffrey, If you click on the following link it will take you to the few tress we sell that have yellow foliage http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/plcid.7/vid.48/ I'm afraid though the best replacement will be determined by what might have killed your Robinia as some other plants may be susceptible too. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 9/28/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    What's wrong with my Robinia?

    Hello, Please can you help. We planted this Robinia about 9 years ago, and it has been a lovely tree until last year when around June the leaves developed brown spots, and then fell continuously throughout summer. There was nothing left to fall off come Autumn. This year it has sprouted leaves close to the trunk. Please advise if we should take it out or prune it hard back. Is there a problem with the soil? Help! Thanks in anticipation. Rob
    Asked on 6/15/2009 by Rob Christmas

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Rob, Robinias are prone to a number of pests and diseases, some of them (like verticillium wilt and phytopthora) can be quite nasty. I am not sure what may have affected yours, but it sounds as though it has really had a set-back and I suspect the branches that dont have new shoots have suffered from dieback. The only way to check if they are alive is to get up into the tree and see if there are any signs of life. If you can gently scrape the branches and if it is green just below the bark, then it is still alive and the chances are good that it will put on new growth. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/16/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    How tall is the Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia'?

    I have finally plumped for the Robinia and am wondering what size the tree will be (height) if delivered in a 10 litre pot?
    Asked on 7/27/2006 by Vincent Connie - Snr MTO Radiotherapy Physics

    1 answer

    • A:

      This plant is sold in a 10 litre pot and is currently arround 1.2 - 1.5m tall.

      Answered on 7/28/2006 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-5

Do you have a question about this product? 

July pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

Early-summer- flowering shrubs can be pruned this month to keep them vigorous and flowering well. It is also the ideal time to prune several trees that are prone to bleeding if pruned at other times, and it’s not too late to complete the pruning jobs for

Read full article