Papaver orientale 'Patty's Plum'

oriental poppy

9cm pot
pot size guide
£5.99 Buy
+
-
2+1 free 9cm pots
pot size guide
£11.98 Buy
+
-

The sultry, willowy Patty is always earlier, flowering in the first week of May, and her unique brown-pink flowers need semi-shade - a hornbeam or green hazel backdrop sets her off

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position:full sun/part-shade
  • Soil:moist, well-drained
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A really luscious oriental poppy with deep reddish-purple flowers in early summer and bristly, grey-green leaves. The silky, pleated petals of this popular variety have been compared to the faded silk of antique ball gowns. Although the flowers of all oriental poppies are ephemeral, they are easy to grow and each plant will produce several flowers. If cut back after flowering, they may even produce a second flush. Plant it in a sunny border, as part of a cottage-garden scheme, alongside grasses or late summer-flowering perennials, such as dahlias, which will provide interest when the plant has died back. 'Patty's Plum' contrasts particularly well with silver foliage plants. It will need staking, as it has a tendance to sprawl.

  • Garden care: Cut back to ground level after flowering. Lift and divide large clumps in autumn.

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

 

Do you want to ask a question about this?

If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
6 Questions | 6 Answers
Displaying questions 1-6
  • Q:

    As a novice gardener when you say to cut oriental poppies down to ground level when they have finished flowering does that mean flower stalks and leaves or just the flower stalks?
    Asked on 19/6/2015 by novice gardener from kenilworth warwickshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      You will find that most of the leaves will have started to die back by mid- to late July, so all of these should be removed too. The plant will then usually put on some new leafy growth in late summer or autumn, which can be left intact until the following year.

      Answered on 24/6/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Exactly the same problem. Patty's Plum have blowsily dominated the border in previous years and have now shrunk to a couple of miserable little yellow leaves. Will they resurrect themselves next year?
    Asked on 27/5/2015 by nutcrackers from border of Northamptonshire and Rutland

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is difficult to say with any certainty, as it will really depend on how severe the damage is.

      I'm sorry not to be more help,

      Answered on 29/5/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    After successfully growing Papaver Patty's Plum for many years, both my plants this year are not thriving. The leaves are stunted, yellow and there is no sign of any buds. Can you suggest what may have caused this and if there is a remedy. If the time has come to replace them, is it wise to replant with the same cultivar in the same position? Thanks!
    Asked on 29/4/2015 by One of the Buds from Devon

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      I suspect this may have been caused by the unusually dry spring we have had, as this has caused lots of plants to be much more compact than they would be normally.

      Answered on 15/5/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Is it ok to plant new poppies out now in March? Are they hardy enough to withstand frosts or would it be better to wait a month or two?
    Asked on 10/3/2015 by JenkyCat from Malvern

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      This poppy is fully hardy so as long as the ground isn't frozen or freezing outside you can plant out now directly in to the garden.
      Hope this helps.

      Answered on 27/3/2015 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    Can I grow Patty's Plum in a pot? If the answer is 'yes', please could you advise what type of compost and size of pot I will need. Thank you.
    Asked on 14/6/2014 by absolute novice from West Oxfordshire (with clay soil and dog

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It may be possible using John Innes No2., however this plant will be much happier planted out in the ground.

      Answered on 19/6/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Can I grow Tricyrtis formosana 'Dark Beauty' in a pot and Poppies at the bottom of the garden?

    Hi, We have a tiny North facing shaded garden and I'm looking for some Autumn colour for our patio. Can I grow Tricyrtis formosana 'Dark Beauty' in a pot? If so how big should the pot be? If not can you recommend something else please? Also I'd love to grow some poppies, we get a fair amount of sunshine in the spring and summer at the very end of the garden will I be able to grow Papaver orientale 'Perry's White' and Papaver orientale 'Effendi' here? Thank you Sally
    Asked on 21/10/2009 by Sally Reay

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Sally, These do well in pots, and I would say one about 40 x 40cm filled with John Innes No2 would be suitable. As for the poppies, these flower best in full sun, but they will also grow in a little light shade. I'm afraid though it may be trial and error to see if your spot is sunny enough. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 22/10/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-6

Do you have a question about this product? 

Prairie

Indulge a passion for ornamental grasses by creating a prairie- or meadow-style garden. They can be richly planted with native wildflowers or a selection of complementary perennials and self-seeding annuals to create a naturalistic planting effect.

Read full article