Myrtus communis

common myrtle

All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection in cold areas)


    In mid to late summer, this bushy, evergreen shrub is festooned with fragrant, white, fluffy flowers, followed by round, purple-black berries. But it is an asset to the garden all year round, with glossy, pointed leaves that give off a fragrant aroma when crushed and provide a handsome backdrop for other flowering plants. A useful and pretty shrub for a sunny border or for growing against a south or west-facing wall.

  • Garden care : Protect from cold, drying winds. Apply a 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant in early spring. Remove any unwanted growth in late spring.

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5 Questions | 5 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    Could you tell me if I grow my Myrtle in a large pot (how large please?) will I be able to prune the plant and is it a slow growing plant? Thank you.
    Asked on 5/14/2014 by Happy Gardener from Pembrokeshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      If you are wanting to grow a myrtus in a pot then I would grow Myrtus communis subsp.tarentina, which is a more compact, rounded variety and is better suited for a container. These plants are slowgrowing, and need very little pruning but you can lightly prune in late spring. Hope this helps.

      Answered on 5/15/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    Dear Bernadette - hope you can help. My mature myrtle has developed pale brown round marks edged by a dark brown ring, and other dark brown markings (some spots, some just blobs). The marks only show faintly on the reverse of the leaf and they are flat, not raised, so I don't know if it could be a scale insect of some kind. It flowers and fruits well, faces west and has a lot of wind to contend with. I pull off the infected leaves but it's a big bush - is there a (preferably organic) spray I can use? or does it just need a) thinning out so more air can circulate or b) more water on the leaves? thank you
    Asked on 2/19/2013 by Browncap from Ealing, London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      I suspect your myrtle is suffering from fungal leaf spot. This is a widespread and not terribly serious problem (particularly on mature plants), but it is unsightly. It is usually and indication that the plant is stressed in some way, so ideally you should try to improve the growing conditions if you can. We do have more details about this problem on our site, so please just click on the link below to go straight to the relevant page.

      http://www.crocus.co.uk/pestsanddiseases/_//top12/Fungal%20leaf%20spot/ArticleID.1170

      I hope this helps,

      Answered on 2/20/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Plants suitable for patio pots

    Hello I wanted to enquire if you have a Sarocococca hookeriana var. humilis, I looked online but it's not listed. I am askng for that particular plant, because I only have a patio and want plants that won't grow to an enormous size or require spectacular care. A rosemary and a dwarf syringa I bought from you are doing very well. Plants always arrive in very good condition which I really appreciate. A Myrtus communis subsp. 'Tarentina' which I potted up immediately in a larger pot suffered shock I think, - I wonder what you know about this myrtle? I am wanting to grow plants on a small patio in containers and wonder if the following plants are suitable:- Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis (if you have got it) or a Sarcococca hookeriana digyna (which is in your listings). Winter Jasmine, or any of the other Jasmines, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia grandiflora but would this be too large for my patio- I am thinking of winter cheer with its red berries, and Nandina Domestica. Many thanks Bernadette
    Asked on 7/26/2009 by Bernadette Matthews

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Bernadette, I'm afraid we do not sell Sacrocococca hookeriana var. humilis, but the other two we list will be fine in a large pot as long as they are kept well fed and watered. It is my experience that most plants will cope if the pot is big enough and they are well looked after, however larger plants like the Jasminum nudiflorum, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia or Nandinas will eventually run out of steam and need to be placed into the garden. You should however be able to get a good few years from them. As for the Myrtus, I have not heard that they particularly dislike being moved, but as they are not fully hardy they need protection in winter. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/27/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-5

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