Hydrangea macrophylla 'Zebra' (PBR)

hydrangea

20% off Hydrangeas
5 litre pot
pot size guide
£29.99 £23.99 Email me when in stock
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  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to October
  • Flower colour: white
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    The glowing white flowerheads and lush green foliage provide a brilliant contrast to the near-black stems. This new hydrangea is perfect for adding a burst of colour to a partially shaded bed and will also make a fine, informal, flowering hedge. Their long flowering period throughout summer and autumn and their tough and undemanding nature, means that these wonderful deciduous shrubs should be top of most gardeners wishlists.

  • Garden care: Leave the old flower heads in place through the winter. As the new shoots start to emerge in spring cut back a third to a quarter of the previous seasons flowering stems to the base and cut back the remaining flower heads to the first pair of buds.

  • CAUTION toxic if eaten/skin & eye irritant

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

 

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15 Questions | 16 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    I have some Zebra Hydrangeas just planted this spring in new landscaping. The blossoms are now brown with not many new buds my instruction sheet said I should dead head to get new blooms but I an hesitant as I have always heard one must be careful with hydrangeas.
    Asked on 18/6/2015 by METS from Northwest Indiana

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      We recommend leaving the old flower heads in place over winter, and as the new shoots start to emerge in spring, you can cut back a third to a quarter of the previous seasons flowering stems to their base. Then cut back the remaining flower heads to the first pair of buds.

      Answered on 24/6/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Is this hydrangea suitable for a container? Want to put it in an urn by the front door.
    Asked on 5/5/2015 by Lu from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Yes, this will do very well in a large container, provided it is kept well fed and watered.

      Answered on 15/5/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    I would like to plant a hydrangea Zebra in a 1m border next to a 2m high fence facing east. Soil is relatively dry but due to be improved with lots of compost. Do you think this hydrangea will thrive? Garden is a white town garden so looking for multiseason plant of this height with white flowers. Thanks.
    Asked on 24/4/2015 by Nc95 from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      If you can improve the soil and make sure the plant is kept well watered (hydrangeas are reasonably thirsty plants), then yes, I think it would be ideal.

      Answered on 15/5/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Hi, I have several of these Hydrangeas planted in large troughs along a border. Some of them seem healthy and have put on some new growth whilst others seem to be struggling. One or two leaves have started to turn brown (from the tip to the halfway point) shrivel up and die. Some of the plants have produced flowers and some haven't. All the plants have been planted in the same soil and in the same area of the garden. Thanks Tracey P.S. What should I do to the affected leaves?
    Asked on 8/18/2014 by I don't have one from Nottinghamshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is not unusual for the leaves of these plants to start looking tatty by the end of summer and any leaves that really spoil the look of the plant can be removed. As for why some of your plants are struggling and others are flourishing, it may be that they are planted too densely and there is just not enough room for them. Hydrangeas are pretty thirsty plants, and particularly when they are grown in pots, they do need lots of water. Feeding them with a good general purpose fertiliser such as MiracleGro or Vitax Q4 during the growing season will also help keep them in tip top condition.

      Answered on 8/27/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    When will this hydrangea (Zebra) start forming foliage in the spring? I'm looking to underplant with some winter- and/or spring-flowering bulbs, to help cover the woody stems below the dried flower heads. I'm mostly thinking of daffodils (from your "6-months of daffodils" collection), but would tulips come up too late? Any recommendations on bulbs to use would be appreciated. These will be in a relatively small, urban garden, so I'm focusing on year-round interest as the whole garden is quite visible from the house. Thank you!
    Asked on 7/31/2014 by LAS from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is difficult to say as it will depend on the weather. If we have a mild Spring, then it could start coming into leaf in March, but if the Spring is colder, then they may not start coming into leaf until late April. If you are thinking of under-planting with bulbs, then I would opt for early flowering bulbs such as snowdrops or crocus.

      Answered on 8/4/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    I planted a lace cap hydrangea couple of years ago and it just isn't growing. There should be no issues with soil as we have two other varieties in different locations of the garden. Any suggestions re what I can do to encourage growth...and flowers!

    Kind regards
    Carol Ashley
    Asked on 3/25/2014 by Toddy from Wightwick

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello Carol,

      It can be very frustrating when plants refuse to grow for seemingly no reason. Even small changes in soil moisture and nutrients, or aspect can make a big difference to the plants vigour. The most likely causes of this would be and air pocket or buried builders rubble (or something else unpleasant) in the soil, or a lack of water. I know there are two other Hydrangeas growing happily in other places in the garden, but the one that is struggling may be close to the base of a wall, or in a more exposed position, which will mean that it is much drier. The best way forward then (if you are confident the soil is OK) is to make sure you keep the plant well watered and fed with a good general purpose fertiliser such as Vitax Q4 - please click on the following link to go straight to it

      http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/vitax-q4-fertiliser/classid.2000009519/

      I hope this helps,

      Answered on 3/27/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Should I dead head each flower head once it's past its best ? Other websites say not, does this mean I should just leave branches with the blooms on & the plant should grow new branches which will provide the summer long flowering ?
    Asked on 8/7/2013 by archie from london

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Afternoon
      I wouldn't dead head as I think the dried dead flowers look attractive left on the plant through the winter. Then in the spring as the new shoots start to emerge cut back a third to a quarter of the previous seasons flowering stems to the base, and cut back the remaining flower heads to the first pair of buds. Hope this helps

      Answered on 8/7/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    I want to plant 2 plants ,one In an east and one in a west facing bed In a courtyard sheltered with the walls of the house on three sides . So each plant will get the sun for around half the day.
    Will these plants but happy in this environment? The soil does not tend to dry out too much and I will mulch well.
    I just need reassurance to how much sun these plants will tolerate, my other hydrangeas ( Annabelle) are in a more shady environment
    Thank you for your help.
    Asked on 2/17/2013 by Scottishgardener from Tunbridge Wells

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      This hydrangea prefers a spot in partial shade, so if each plant gets sun for just half a day then they should be fine.

      I hope this helps,

      Answered on 2/19/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    What shade of blue will my Hydrangea be?

    I have just looked at your blue Hydrangeas on the website, and I am curious to know, which picture shows the true likeness of colour for these plant? Thank you.
    Asked on 4/9/2010 by PATRICK BARRETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, The flower colour of the Hydrangea flower will vary depending on the pH of your soil, so they are more blue in acidic soils and take on pink tones when planted in alkaline soils. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    What colour flower will a Hydrangea produce in a lime soil?

    Hi, I like the Hydrangea macrophylla 'Endless Summer Blue' ('Bailmer') in a 5 litre pot. On the website it doesn't mention any specific soil requirements. What colour will the flowers be in lime soil? Thank you Stephanie
    Asked on 3/8/2010 by Stephanie Thorne

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Stephanie Like all the other Hydrangeas, the flower colour of this cultivar will become pinker in alkaline soils, so ideally should be grown in neutral to acidic soils to keep the colour. I'm sorry for any confusion and will amend the details on our site to make this clearer. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 3/9/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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