Cornus sanguinea 'Midwinter Fire'

dogwood

12lt pot (0.8-1m)
pot size guide
£49.99 £44.99 Buy
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A twiggy ‘bonfire’ with winter stems in shades of orange and red at the upper tips to mustard-yellow down below

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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  • Position: full sun to part shade
  • Soil: any moderately fertile soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This deciduous shrub has oval, mid-green leaves and produces small, creamy-white flowers in May and June. But it's really grown for the brilliant, flame-coloured stems that are revealed when the leaves, which turn orange-yellow in autumn, fall. This fabulous dogwood looks best planted in groups in damp areas of the garden, beside water, or in a winter border. One of our recommended plants, it's best in full sun, and works particularly well with red or purple-stemmed varieties of dogwood.

  • Garden care: For best stem colour, cut the stems back hard to within 5-7cm (2-3in) from the ground in March and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or horse manure around the base of the plant.

Cornus alba 'Sibirica'

red-barked dogwood

Bright coral-red stems in winter

£9.99 Buy

Lonicera × purpusii 'Winter Beauty'

winter honeysuckle

Fantastic fragrance during the winter

£12.99 Buy

Hamamelis mollis

Chinese witch hazel

Spidery flowers with lovely winter fragrance

£29.99 Buy

Euonymus fortunei 'Emerald 'n' Gold'

evergreen bittersweet

A tough evergreen shrub with yellow, variegated leaves

£7.99 Buy
 

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5 Questions | 5 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    Creating a Winter Garden

    Dear Crocus I am wanting to create a " winter garden " area and fancy an Acer griseum as the central feature. I had thought of planting a Cornus Midwinter Fire and Bergenia 'Bressingham Ruby' to complement the scheme but I would welcome any other suggestions please. Many thanks Claire
    Asked on 2/26/2010 by CLAIRE LAWTON

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Claire, If you click on the following link it will take you to all our winter flowering plants. I would definitely recommend hellebores and snowdrops, perhaps some Cyclamen and and Euonymus fortunei for foliage colour. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/vid.204/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 3/1/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

    Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
    Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
  • Q:

    Can I prune my dogwood now?

    I have a small Cornus florida that was planted in the Autumn. It is bushier than I would like as I want a tree rather than shrub. Its starting to bud now and I probably should have pruned it in the winter, but is it too late now?
    Asked on 3/17/2005 by Richard Stanaro

    1 answer

    • A:

      Ideally you should prune this Cornus in late winter or early spring. However you may still get away with it if you do it very soon. Just cut back the branches you don't want by pruning to an outward facing bud.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-5

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