Centaurea 'Jordy'

knapweed

9cm pot
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£5.99 Buy
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3 × 9cm pots
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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May to July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Magnificent, deepest plum-purple flowers top upright stems in late spring and early summer above bushy clumps of foliage. The flowers have a shaggy appearance and mix well with a whole host of colours including rusts, reds, purples and pinks. A new twist on a cottage garden classic, the seedheads will provide interest for several months after the flowers have faded.

  • Garden care: Stake with brushwood or bamboo canes before the flowers appear. Cut back to the ground after flowering and a second flush may appear. Lift and divide large clumps every three years in spring.


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5 Questions | 5 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    If the centaurea gets mildew.......how to I treat it please ?
    Asked on 19/4/2016 by Garden gnome from Dumfries and Galloway

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      If the plant is well established this is a relatively harmless disease. However, care should be taken with younger plants. If you don't want to use chemicals, you can mulch well in spring and autumn with well rotted farmyard manure, as this will prevent the roots drying out too much, and if possible, make sure the plants are not overcrowded so air can circulate around them. You should also remove all dead leaves in autumn to prevent the spores from over wintering.

      Alternatively you can spray at the first signs of infection with a good fungicide such as Doff Systemic Fungus Control, Bayer Garden Fungus Fighter or Scotts Fungus Clear Ultra.

      Answered on 20/4/2016 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Will this plant tolerate very boggy soil?
    Asked on 18/1/2016 by Clay boots from United Kingdom

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      No these plants prefer a well drained soil, but there are other plants that will tolerate boggy soils.
      I have attached a link below to perennial plants that like a boggy/damp shade which you can further refine to soil type, flowering time etc.
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/plcid.2/vid.101/
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 19/1/2016 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    Hi,

    Will these do well in pots? Thanks for your time.
    Asked on 26/4/2015 by Mat from Wapping

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      These plants will prefer being in the ground, but you could grow it in a large pot - although it may be more susceptible to mildew.

      Answered on 15/5/2015 by Helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Hi crocus plant people.....put my mind at rest!

    I have the blue version all over my garden, love them. Bought this black one to mix things up a bit in one of my beds and had it in a pot this year to see what it flowered like...it grew and flowered then I went on holiday.....the pot now appears empty barring compost whilst my blue ones are still sat there showing newly grown leafy mounds? Is this normal for the black one or have I lost it?
    Asked on 10/11/2014 by Curlygirl from East Yorkshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      This is is a deciduous perennial so it will die back in the autumn, so it might have died back earlier than the blue form, alternatively you might have lost it if the pot dried out when you were on holiday.
      I would wait now until next spring, and fingers-crossed it comes back. Hope this helps.

      Answered on 12/11/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    Hi, can you tell me why you need to lift and divide clumps every 3 years - what happens if I don't do that? They overcrowd and suffocate or...?

    By the way: do they spread?

    Thanks
    Asked on 4/7/2014 by Aicha from London NW

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      These do form clumps, which get bigger every year and will eventually grow to around 60cm across. You do not need to lift and divide them every 3 years, but if you don't, then the centre of the clump tends to become congested and it will then produce fewer flowers.

      Answered on 8/7/2014 by helen from crocus
Displaying questions 1-5

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